Exclusive: Labour MPs launch new Milibandite group

The One Nation group will seek to "outride" for the Labour leader's ideas and demonstrate that the party has moved into a post-Blairite/Brownite era.

Since Ed Miliband became Labour leader, many have noted the lack of an identifiable band of supporters to champion his ideas and defend him from attack. For fear of fracturing party unity after his narrow victory in 2010, Miliband avoided cultivating a political faction as Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair did. "I am my own outrider", he has often privately remarked. It is an approach that has left him vulnerable to internal criticism, most notably last summer. One question frequently asked during those torrid weeks was "where are the Milibandites?"

Among the aims of last week's shadow cabinet reshuffle was to offer an answer. The Labour leader rewarded those who have engaged with his political and ideological project and who have shown consistent loyalty. It was notable that both Tristram Hunt (promoted to shadow education secretary) and Gloria De Piero (promoted to shadow minister for women and equalities) contributed chapters to the recent book One Nation: power, hope, community, regarded in the party as the founding text of the Milibandites (it was co-edited by two of his early supporters, Rachel Reeves and Owen Smith). Other contributors, such as Dan Jarvis, Rushanara Ali and Kate Green, were also promoted to more senior posts.

In an attempt to continue to give greater definition to Miliband's project, those involved in the book have now launched a formal One Nation group. The aim, one shadow cabinet minister told me, would be to "outride" for Miliband's ideas, to champion community politics (a central theme of the book) and to demonstrate that the party had moved into a "post-Blairite/Brownite era".

In its supportive stance towards Miliband, it is analogous to the Conservative 301 Group, the loyalist faction formed to act as a counterweight to the 1922 committee. The test of the group's success will be whether it can advance Miliband's project without merely being seen as a front for the leadership.

Newly appointed Labour shadow cabinet ministers Gloria de Piero, Tristram Hunt and Emma Reynolds take part in a photocall in London last week. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

Donald Trump is definitely the Republican presidential candidate

Previously unpledged delegates have revealed their support for the billionaire, taking him past the delegate tally required.

Donald Trump has attained the number of delegates required to become the Republican Party’s presidential nominee. According to Associated Press, Trump has reached 1,238 delegates, one more than needed to secure his place as the Republican candidate in November’s general election.

Trump has been the presumptive Republican nominee since early May, when his last remaining rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich suspended their campaigns. Still, with five primaries still to come and some delegates not required to reveal their preference until the Republican national convention in July, Trump was not quite over the line.

Associated Press has calculated that Trump is in fact now secure as nominee after speaking to previously unpledged delegates who revealed their support for the bombastic billionaire. Trump, whose candidacy was initially seen as a publicity stunt, has so far come top in 34 of the primary and caucus contests.  

On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders has vowed to continue to pursue the party’s presidential nomination to the party’s convention, where delegates are officially allocated and the party’s candidate declared. However, Sanders currently has the support of just 1,539 delegates compared to Hillary Clinton’s 2,305, with 2,383 needed for the nomination. 

Henry Zeffman writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2015.