Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A new populism is shaping politics in Britain and beyond (Financial Times)

There is a profound ignorance among the powerful as to the depth of anti-elite feeling, says John McDermott

2. The 'white widow', like the black, looms larger in the imagination than in fact (Guardian)

Samantha Lewthwaite is 'world's most wanted' despite any hard evidence. How Clouseau-like we must seem to al-Shabaab, says Marina Hyde

3. Free societies can never be completely safe (Times)

We cannot protect every local school and shopping centre from terrorists — and we should not try, argues Janice Turner

4. Labour's energy price freeze chimes with the spirit of 1997. It's not 'back to the 70s' (Guardian)

Our plans are in line with the hugely popular windfall tax on privatised utilities. The Tories scorned that too, says Douglas Alexander

5. Make Sochi 2014 the gayest Olympics ever (Times)

If we are going – if our solidarity is in our very presence – how can we ramp up that solidarity to the max, asks Caitlin Moran

6. To win the battle for the consumer, Cameron must cut taxes soon (Daily Telegraph)

Labour’s complaints about the high price of energy should prompt a bold free-market response, says Charles Moore

7. Cameron’s patronising attitude towards women will cost him the election (Independent)

Ninety five years after women got the vote, the Tory Conference will see 128 fringe meetings at which not a single woman is due to speak, says Chris Bryant

8. The new Pope is bringing glasnost to the Vatican (Financial Times)

No one knows how his ideas will fare – but everybody senses they challenge conservative power says David Gardner

9. Ed Miliband's new populism doesn't have to end with energy prices (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland: From banks to railways, even welfare and immigration, Labour can go much further and still keep the public onside

10. Global lukewarming need not be catastrophic (Times)

There’s a middle way between those who deny climate change is real and those who say it’s disastrous, says Matt Ridley

 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
Dan Kitwood/Getty
Show Hide image

I believe only Yvette Cooper has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy Corbyn

All the recent polling suggests Andy Burnham is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy Corbyn, says Diana Johnson MP.

Tom Blenkinsop MP on the New Statesman website today says he is giving his second preference to Andy Burnham as he thinks that Andy has the best chance of beating Jeremy.

This is on the basis that if Yvette goes out first all her second preferences will swing behind Andy, whereas if Andy goes out first then his second preferences, due to the broad alliance he has created behind his campaign, will all or largely switch to the other male candidate, Jeremy.

Let's take a deep breath and try and think through what will be the effect of preferential voting in the Labour leadership.

First of all, it is very difficult to know how second preferences will switch. From my telephone canvassing there is some rather interesting voting going on, but I don't accept that Tom’s analysis is correct. I have certainly picked up growing support for Yvette in recent weeks.

In fact you can argue the reverse of Tom’s analysis is true – Andy has moved further away from the centre and, as a result, his pitch to those like Tom who are supporting Liz first is now narrower. As a result, Yvette is more likely to pick up those second preferences.

Stats from the Yvette For Labour team show Yvette picking up the majority of second preferences from all candidates – from the Progress wing supporting Liz to the softer left fans of Jeremy – and Andy's supporters too. Their figures show many undecideds opting for Yvette as their first preference, as well as others choosing to switch their first preference to Yvette from one of the other candidates. It's for this reason I still believe only Yvette has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy and then to go on to win in 2020.

It's interesting that Andy has not been willing to make it clear that second preferences should go to Yvette or Liz. Yvette has been very clear that she would encourage second preferences to be for Andy or Liz.

Having watched Andy on Sky's Murnaghan show this morning, he categorically states that Labour will not get beyond first base with the electorate at a general election if we are not economically credible and that fundamentally Jeremy's economic plans do not add up. So, I am unsure why Andy is so unwilling to be clear on second preferences.

All the recent polling suggests Andy is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy. He trails fourth in London – where a huge proportion of our electorate is based.

So I would urge Tom to reflect more widely on who is best placed to provide the strongest opposition to the Tories, appeal to the widest group of voters and reach out to the communities we need to win back. I believe that this has to be Yvette.

The Newsnight focus group a few days ago showed that Yvette is best placed to win back those former Labour voters we will need in 2020.

Labour will pay a massive price if we ignore this.

Diana Johnson is the Labour MP for Hull North.