Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A new populism is shaping politics in Britain and beyond (Financial Times)

There is a profound ignorance among the powerful as to the depth of anti-elite feeling, says John McDermott

2. The 'white widow', like the black, looms larger in the imagination than in fact (Guardian)

Samantha Lewthwaite is 'world's most wanted' despite any hard evidence. How Clouseau-like we must seem to al-Shabaab, says Marina Hyde

3. Free societies can never be completely safe (Times)

We cannot protect every local school and shopping centre from terrorists — and we should not try, argues Janice Turner

4. Labour's energy price freeze chimes with the spirit of 1997. It's not 'back to the 70s' (Guardian)

Our plans are in line with the hugely popular windfall tax on privatised utilities. The Tories scorned that too, says Douglas Alexander

5. Make Sochi 2014 the gayest Olympics ever (Times)

If we are going – if our solidarity is in our very presence – how can we ramp up that solidarity to the max, asks Caitlin Moran

6. To win the battle for the consumer, Cameron must cut taxes soon (Daily Telegraph)

Labour’s complaints about the high price of energy should prompt a bold free-market response, says Charles Moore

7. Cameron’s patronising attitude towards women will cost him the election (Independent)

Ninety five years after women got the vote, the Tory Conference will see 128 fringe meetings at which not a single woman is due to speak, says Chris Bryant

8. The new Pope is bringing glasnost to the Vatican (Financial Times)

No one knows how his ideas will fare – but everybody senses they challenge conservative power says David Gardner

9. Ed Miliband's new populism doesn't have to end with energy prices (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland: From banks to railways, even welfare and immigration, Labour can go much further and still keep the public onside

10. Global lukewarming need not be catastrophic (Times)

There’s a middle way between those who deny climate change is real and those who say it’s disastrous, says Matt Ridley

 

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.
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RMT poised to rejoin the Labour Party

The transport union is set to vote on reaffiliation to the party, with RMT leaders backing the move.

Plans are being drawn up for the RMT (the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers) to reaffiliate to the Labour Party in the wake of Jeremy Corbyn’s significant gains in the general election, the New Statesman has learnt.

The union, which represents tube drivers and other workers across the transport sector, was expelled from the Labour Party under Tony Blair after some Scottish branches voted to support the Scottish Socialist Party instead.

But the RMT endorsed both of Corbyn’s bids for the Labour leadership and its ruling national executive committee backed a Labour vote on 8 June.

Corbyn addressed the RMT’s annual general meeting in Exeter yesterday, where he was “given a hero’s welcome”, in the words of one delegate. Mick Cash, the RMT’s general secretary, praised Corbyn as the union’s “long-term friend and comrade”.

After the meeting, Steve Hedley, assistant general secretary at the RMT, posted a picture to Facebook with John McDonnell. The caption read: “With the shadow chancellor John McDonnell arguing that we should affiliate to the Labour Party after consulting fully and democratically with our members”.

The return of the RMT to Labour would be welcomed by the party leadership with open arms. And although its comparably small size would mean that the RMT would have little effect on the internal workings of Labour Party conference or its ruling NEC, its wide spread across the country could make the union a power player in the life of local Labour parties.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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