Labour appoints Patrick Hennessy as deputy director of communications

The party says the Sunday Telegraph's political editor will "sharpen Labour’s attack stories, improve message discipline and ensure the party delivers a 24-hour news cycle."

Just in time for its conference, Labour has announced the appointment of the Sunday Telegraph's political editor Patrick Hennessy as its deputy director of communications.

The latest addition to Team Miliband, will work alongside director of communications Bob Roberts, the former political editor of the Daily Mirror.

The party said: "In his new role, Patrick will direct, shape and lead the daily media output of the Labour Party. He will sharpen Labour’s attack stories, improve message discipline and ensure the party delivers a 24-hour news cycle."

Ed Miliband said: "I am delighted to welcome Paddy to the Labour Party as our new Deputy Director of Communications. His experience working at a range of national newspapers will add significant expertise to the Labour Party’s communications team. I’m looking forward to working with him."

Hennessy said: "I am sad to be leaving the Sunday Telegraph after nine great years but this is an exciting new challenge. After nearly 30 years working in newspapers, it's a big move but a simple task: to help Labour win the general election. I’m delighted to be joining."

Ed Miliband speaks at the TUC conference at the Bournemouth International Centre on September 10, 2013. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.