How Miliband's new slogan was inspired by Blair

The Labour leader's new motif, "Britain can do better than this", is an echo of the title of the party's 1997 manifesto: "Britain deserves better".

After introducing the "one nation" theme last year, Ed Miliband adopted the slogan "Britain can do better than this" in his speech yesterday. In doing so, he drew inspiration from an unlikely source. As the image below shows, Miliband's new motif is uncannily similar to the title of Labour's 1997 manifesto: "because Britain deserves better".

Peter Mandelson, for one, will be pleased. Earlier this week, in an article for the FT, he wrote that "One Nation is a good line for a banner but needs an argument to support it nd to set out an alternative. In 1997, our rallying cry was 'Britain deserves better'. It is time to bring out a new, distinctive version of this election-winning argument."

He may have kept his promise to "turn the page" on New Labour but, on this occasion, Miliband borrowed unashamedly from the Blair playbook.

Tony Blair with Ed Miliband during a Loyal Address service to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II at Westminster Hall in London on March 20, 2012. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.