Godfrey Bloom hits Michael Crick, uses word 'sluts'

The Ukip MEP continues to be no stranger to controversy.

Having presumably decided that a catalogue of other offensive speeches (most notably the one in which he referred to the fictional nation of ‘Bongo Bongo Land’) weren’t enough, Ukip MEP Godfrey Bloom has attended an event at the Ukip conference in which he hit Channel 4’s Michael Crick with a brochure and referred to women as ‘sluts’.

Bloom was carrying a copy of the Ukip conference book which promises to ‘change the face of politics’, despite being noticeably adorned with only Caucasian faces. Crick questioned this lack of diversity, only to be smacked over the head with the offending article and told that he was a ‘racist’ for bringing up skin colour. ‘You disgust me,’ Bloom added, before making a swift departure.

The ‘slut’ comment is perhaps more easily forgiven, being as it was connected to a comment about cleaning fridges rather than sexual liberation ('This place is full of sluts!' in response to a woman commenting that she never cleaned behind her fridge.) It seems likely that Bloom was using the old-fashioned term for slovenly people who don't dust properly, admittedly one that fell out of common usage for untidiness a fair few decades ago. Then again, we can safely assume from Bloom’s political opinions that he never did quite catch up with the twenty-first century (or, indeed, the 1980s) in the first place.

Enjoy this delightful gif of the incident, courtesy of Tom Phillips (@flashboy):

Godfrey Bloom. Image: Getty
Holly Baxter is a freelance journalist who writes regularly for The Guardian and The New Statesman. She is also one half of The Vagenda and releases a book on the media in May 2014.
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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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