Godfrey Bloom hits Michael Crick, uses word 'sluts'

The Ukip MEP continues to be no stranger to controversy.

Having presumably decided that a catalogue of other offensive speeches (most notably the one in which he referred to the fictional nation of ‘Bongo Bongo Land’) weren’t enough, Ukip MEP Godfrey Bloom has attended an event at the Ukip conference in which he hit Channel 4’s Michael Crick with a brochure and referred to women as ‘sluts’.

Bloom was carrying a copy of the Ukip conference book which promises to ‘change the face of politics’, despite being noticeably adorned with only Caucasian faces. Crick questioned this lack of diversity, only to be smacked over the head with the offending article and told that he was a ‘racist’ for bringing up skin colour. ‘You disgust me,’ Bloom added, before making a swift departure.

The ‘slut’ comment is perhaps more easily forgiven, being as it was connected to a comment about cleaning fridges rather than sexual liberation ('This place is full of sluts!' in response to a woman commenting that she never cleaned behind her fridge.) It seems likely that Bloom was using the old-fashioned term for slovenly people who don't dust properly, admittedly one that fell out of common usage for untidiness a fair few decades ago. Then again, we can safely assume from Bloom’s political opinions that he never did quite catch up with the twenty-first century (or, indeed, the 1980s) in the first place.

Enjoy this delightful gif of the incident, courtesy of Tom Phillips (@flashboy):

Godfrey Bloom. Image: Getty
Holly Baxter is a freelance journalist who writes regularly for The Guardian and The New Statesman. She is also one half of The Vagenda and releases a book on the media in May 2014.
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Labour to strip "abusive" registered supporters of their vote in the leadership contest

The party is asking members to report intimidating behaviour - but is vague about what this entails. 

Labour already considered blocking social media users who describe others as "scab" and "scum" from applying to vote. Now it is asking members to report abuse directly - and the punishment is equally harsh. 

Registered and affiliated supporters will lose their vote if found to be engaging in abusive behaviour, while full members could be suspended. 

Labour general secretary Iain McNicol said: “The Labour Party should be the home of lively debate, of new ideas and of campaigns to change society.

“However, for a fair debate to take place, people must be able to air their views in an atmosphere of respect. They shouldn’t be shouted down, they shouldn’t be intimidated and they shouldn’t be abused, either in meetings or online.

“Put plainly, there is simply too much of it taking place and it needs to stop."

Anyone who comes across abusive behaviour is being encouraged to email validation@labour.org.uk.

Since the bulk of Labour MPs decided to oppose Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, supporters of both camps have traded insults on social media and at constituency Labour party gatherings, leading the party to suspend most meetings until after the election. 

In a more ominous sign of intimidation, a brick was thrown through the window of Corbyn challenger Angela Eagle's constituency office. 

McNicol said condemning such "appalling" behaviour was meaningless unless backed up by action: “I want to be clear, if you are a member and you engage in abusive behaviour towards other members it will be investigated and you could be suspended while that investigation is carried out. 

“If you are a registered supporter or affiliated supporter and you engage in abusive behaviour you will not get a vote in this leadership election."

What does abusive behaviour actually mean?

The question many irate social media users will be asking is, what do you mean by abusive? 

A leaked report from Labour's National Executive Committee condemned the word "traitor" as well as "scum" and "scab". A Labour spokeswoman directed The Staggers to the Labour website's leadership election page, but this merely stated that "any racist, abusive or foul language or behaviour at meetings, on social media or in any other context" will be dealt with. 

But with emotions running high, and trust already so low between rival supporters, such vague language is going to provide little confidence in the election process.