Godfrey Bloom hits Michael Crick, uses word 'sluts'

The Ukip MEP continues to be no stranger to controversy.

Having presumably decided that a catalogue of other offensive speeches (most notably the one in which he referred to the fictional nation of ‘Bongo Bongo Land’) weren’t enough, Ukip MEP Godfrey Bloom has attended an event at the Ukip conference in which he hit Channel 4’s Michael Crick with a brochure and referred to women as ‘sluts’.

Bloom was carrying a copy of the Ukip conference book which promises to ‘change the face of politics’, despite being noticeably adorned with only Caucasian faces. Crick questioned this lack of diversity, only to be smacked over the head with the offending article and told that he was a ‘racist’ for bringing up skin colour. ‘You disgust me,’ Bloom added, before making a swift departure.

The ‘slut’ comment is perhaps more easily forgiven, being as it was connected to a comment about cleaning fridges rather than sexual liberation ('This place is full of sluts!' in response to a woman commenting that she never cleaned behind her fridge.) It seems likely that Bloom was using the old-fashioned term for slovenly people who don't dust properly, admittedly one that fell out of common usage for untidiness a fair few decades ago. Then again, we can safely assume from Bloom’s political opinions that he never did quite catch up with the twenty-first century (or, indeed, the 1980s) in the first place.

Enjoy this delightful gif of the incident, courtesy of Tom Phillips (@flashboy):

Godfrey Bloom. Image: Getty
Holly Baxter is a freelance journalist who writes regularly for The Guardian and The New Statesman. She is also one half of The Vagenda and releases a book on the media in May 2014.
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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

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Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.