The 5 key pledges from Ed Miliband's speech to Labour conference

From an energy price freeze to after school clubs, the highlights of Ed Miliband's speech.

1. A cut to business rates

"We would use the money that this government used to cut taxes for large businesses to cut business rates for 1.5m small businesses."

2. Breakfast clubs in schools

"We want every school in Britain to have the breakfast clubs and childcare that we need."

3. A freeze in energy bills

"If we win the election 2015, the next Labour government will freeze gas and electricity prices until the start of 2017."

4. An end to land banking

"We'll say to private developers we can't just sit on land: either use the land or lose the land . . . we'll identify new towns and garden cities and we'll have an aim that at the end of the parliament, Britain will be building 200,000 homes a year."

5. An end to the bedroom tax

"David Cameron was the Prime Minister who introduced the bedroom tax. I'll be the Prime Minister who repeals the bedroom tax."

Ed Miliband gives his speech at Labour conference. Photo: Getty
Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.