The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman
  1. Snowden: UK government now leaking documents about itself (Guardian)

    The NSA whistleblower says: 'I have never spoken with, worked with, or provided any journalistic materials to the Independent', writes Glen Greenwald

  2. Kids need more playtime – and less school (Independent)

    Too many children spend the most magical lives of their years sitting down, writes Amy Jenkins.

  3. Gender stereotyping is unhelpful and counter-productive – whoever's doing it (Guardian)

    Assuming that men are not responsible for their actions harms them just as much as it harms women, writes Deborah Orr

  4. The Arab Spring has failed because constitutional democracy needs nation-states (Telegraph)

    What is happening to the region, so recently optimistic? asks Daniel Hannan

  5. Official: wind turbines are an iniquitous assault on property rights (Telegraph)

    Why don't I wish to buy my dream home in my dream valley any more? Because the greed and selfishness of a local sheep farmer has killed it, that's why, writes James Delingpole

  6. Terrorism will win if the trust has gone (Financial Times)

    Security and privacy are incompatible goals, writes John Thornhill

  7. Steve Jobs’ genius isn’t movie material (Financial Times)

    The new biopic of the Apple co-founder is a corporate hagiography for the YouTube age, writes Christopher Caldwell

  8. What’s bugging America? (Financial Times)

    In Manhattan, it was easier to bring guns into the lobby of my building than a new mattress, writes Gillian Tett

  9. Scotland is going it alone – regardless of the referendum (Guardian)

    There may be no divorce, but devolution combined with a rightwing Westminster government is moving our nations in separate directions, says Steve Richards.

  10. Caroline Lucas standing in a field waving a placard? Outrageous! (Independent)

    The MP obviously took it too far by meeting a bloke with dreadlocks who lives up trees, writes Mark Steel.