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Morning Call: Pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman
  1. NSA and GCHQ – too close for comfort (Guardian)
    It makes sense for the US and UK to co-operate and share, but payments between the two agencies must mean influence, writes Nick Hopkins.
  2. Britain is slamming its doors against the world (Financial Times)
    A champion of the liberal, open international system is redefining itself as a resentful victim, writes Philip Stephens.
  3. One thing Ryanair got right - charging extra for needless hand luggage (Independent)
    We know what a trip on Ryanair means: cheap and not very cheerful. But why do people now take huge bags on the flight instead of checking them in, asks Simon Kelner.
  4. Thatcher and Reagan may have seemed like equals. His invasion of Grenada shows they were not (Independent)
    The embarrassment and humiliation have in fact been known for years. But only now do we see how carefully Washington kept its supposedly close ally in the dark, writes Peter Popham.
  5. Parking fines rocket because of the centre's addiction to power (Guardian)
    Conservatives like Eric Pickles espouse freedom for local councils, but they have done nothing to show they mean it, writes Simon Jenkins.
  6. Children die when social workers stop feeling (Times)
    We need more raw revulsion at tragedies like Daniel Pelka’s, not administrative change, writes Camila Batmanghelidjh.
  7. So which anniversary will sway the Scots? (Telegraph)
    Both Bannockburn and the Great War will loom large when Scotland votes on independence, one year from now, Sunder Katwala points out.
  8. Moral objections to the case for dishing Wonga (Financial Times)
    There are better ways for the Archbishop of Canterbury to help the poor, says Jonathan Ford.
  9. It’s no wonder none of my friends are teenage Tories (Telegraph)
    Left-wing propaganda on A-level Politics syllabuses strongly influences 18-year-olds' opinions, argues Carola Binney.
  10. Why we can’t see the risks of monkey business (Times)
    Gaby Hinscliff offers a lesson from Longleat for Anthony Weiner.