The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: Pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman
  1. We won't need a PC World NHS if more of us go private (Guardian)
    Those who can should unburden the health service, so it can act as the good, basic provider that Beveridge intended, writes Melissa Kite.
  2. Vince Cable is proving himself a master of hit-and-run politics (Telegraph)
    The Business Secretary's interventions on immigration and housing are part of a wider tactical game, writes Paul Goodman.
  3. The lobbying row has given David Cameron a very tricky dilemma (Guardian)
    As a lobbyist, I can see Lynton Crosby's attraction. But retaining him could cause the PM huge damage, writes Peter Bingle.
  4. Geeks in jeans are the Treasury’s new heroes (Times, £)
    A digital revolution, masterminded by a team of dress-down civil servants, could save the taxpayer billions, writes Rachel Sylvester.
  5. Advancing Internet freedom doesn’t come for free (Washington Post)
    Technology is not the only answer to advancing global democracy, but it is the most powerful and cost-efficient weapon currently at our disposal, writes Craig A. Newman.
  6. If gays aren’t hugged, everyone is stamped on (Times, £)
    The Pope has shown that he knows homosexual rights matter because they tell us how states deal with difference, writes Hugo Rifkind.
  7. UK should accept it is London-centred (Financial Times)
    The capital has not flourished because of favourable treatment, writes Janan Ganesh.
  8. Racism? It is not racist to ask people who are here illegally to leave Britain (Daily Mail)
    Our campaign targets illegal immigrants without any discrimination at all between them. By no stretch of the rational imagination can it be described as ‘racist’, argues the immigration minister Mark Harper.
  9. PR, an industry with a PR problem (Financial Times)
    One of its own protagonists is forecasting the death of the sector, writes Brian Groom.
  10. Where are the criminals? On their laptops (Telegraph)
    As online fraud soars, it’s good to remember the old adage: if it looks too good to be true, it probably is, writes Philip Johnston.