The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from today's newspapers.

New Statesman
  1. The numbers that add up to trouble for all political parties (Observer)
    Labour, the Tories and the Lib Dems must reinvent themselves as mass-membership organisations, writes Andrew Rawnsley.
  2. Ed Miliband's bid to make us pay for his party (Daily Mail)
    There is undoubtedly a hidden agenda behind Ed Miliband’s decision to try to reform the way the unions help finance Labour, writes Simon Heffer.
  3. On school meals, has Michael Gove gone all socialist? (Observer)
    The minister's faith in a food plan suggests he accepts the state has a role to play, writes Jay Rayner.
  4. Modern voters are very receptive to the Right's old economic values (Sunday Telegraph)
    Many ethnic minority populations are aspirational and hard-working. They should be natural conservative voters, writes Janet Daley.
  5. What's so wrong with marriage? (Independent on Sunday)
    Janet Street-Porter would like to see it rebranded, because children whose parents live together may suffer when relationships break down.
  6. Government reshuffle rumours bode ill for forward-looking Tories (Sunday Telegraph)
    A government that ejects a politician of David Willetts' calibre, intellect and experience to make space for (say) an Etonian with a full head of hair is practising self-harm, writes Matthew d’Ancona.
  7. Ed’s offering to give up £10m. What about you Dave? (Sunday Times)
    The old maxim had it that the Tories got into trouble over sex and Labour over money. No more, writes Adam Boulton.
  8. Bravo, Ed Miliband! But who'll pay for the election now? (Independent on Sunday)
    It takes an unusual form of political principle to say no to £9m a year, writes John Rentoul
  9. The one that didn’t get away: small fishermen net a little justice (Sunday Times)
    Charles Clover praises the High Court's ruling in favour of small-boat fishermen.
  10. Open season on black boys after a verdict like this (Guardian)
    Calls for calm after George Zimmerman was acquitted of murdering Trayvon Martin are empty words for black families, writes Gary Younge.