The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman
  1. Just remember, children born out of wedlock are loved – and will vote (£) (Telegraph)
    The Office for National Statistics predicts that most children in 2016 will be born out of wedlock - but that doesn't mean they will be raised in single parent households, writes Graeme Archer.
  2. A telling failure at G4S (£) (Financial Times)
    Service companies need to be more transparent to parliament and the public, says John McDermott.
  3. Our postman delivers a sack of bad news (£) (Telegraph)
    Things are going to go downhill with privatisation, according to the man in the hi-viz vest, writes Vicki Woods
  4. Faslane: this was a nuclear weapon for the SNP (Guardian)
    The rumoured plans for the naval base were a reminder of how deeply unpopular Trident is among Scots, writes AL Kennedy
  5. White Van voters will decide the next PM (£) (Times)
    Tories can win by cutting taxes for the low-paid, helping families to buy homes and increasing apprenticeships, writes Robert Halfon
  6. As G4S 'overcharging' and BBC payouts reveal, life in the UK just isn't fair (Guardian)
    If all this were in period costume, a Downton Abbey world of elites, we would be appalled. So why isn't there more outrage, asks Jonathan Freedland.
  7. My step-by-step programme for curing men of sexism (Independent)
    It's really not that hard to understand. Are you the man who bellows, “DON’T GET HYSTERICAL!” if a woman is trying to make point. Congrats, you're a sexist berk, writes Grace Dent.
  8. Guess who’s going to pay for politics? You! (Times)
    The political parties will ask the taxpayer to pay their bills once unions and tycoons have walked away, writes Robert Halfon.
  9. The Privatisation of Royal Mail: Are you ready to deliver your own letters? (Independent)
    Vince Cable has assured us a privatised Royal Mail would maintain all its services. Of course it will, because making a profit will hardly figure in their plans at all, writes Mark Steel
  10. Labour realised that parties need recruits, not conscripts (£) (Financial Times)
    Every political party faces possible scandals over its sources of finance, writes Peter Clarke.