The Labour EU referendum rebels: the full list

The six Labour MPs who voted in favour of Tory MP James Wharton's EU referendum bill.

Not one MP dared to vote against Tory MP James Wharton's EU referendum bill at its second reading today, with 304 voting in favour. But while most Labour MPs followed their leader's advice to abstain, there were six who backed the bill in an unusual alliance of the party's old left and old right. They were:

Roger Godsiff

Kate Hoey

Kelvin Hopkins

Dennis Skinner

Graham Stringer 

Gisela Stuart

This is notably fewer than the number (15) who support the Labour for a Referendum campaign, with many put off by what they see as the excessive partisanship of the Tories. 

Having avoided voting against a referendum, the key question now for Miliband is whether he will either table or support an amendment calling for a pre-2015 vote. An increasing number of Labour MPs are of the view that the party should use this device to split the Tories (Cameron has promised a vote in 2017 following a renegotiation) and to avoid the charge that it is denying the people a say. In a significant intervention yesterday, shadow work and pensions minister Ian Austin broke ranks to call for a referendum at the same time as next year's European elections. Whether or not Miliband has the chutzpah to adopt this strategy, it is significant that he has not ruled it out. 

Dennis Skinner in full flow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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If Seumas Milne leaves Jeremy Corbyn, he'll do it on his own terms

The Corbynista comms chief has been keeping a diary. 

It’s been a departure long rumoured: Seumas Milne to leave post as Jeremy Corbyn’s director of communications and strategy to return to the Guardian.

With his loan deal set to expire on 20 October, speculation is mounting that he will quit the leader’s office. 

Although Milne is a key part of the set-up – at times of crisis, Corbyn likes to surround himself with long-time associates, of whom Milne is one – he has enemies within the inner circle as well. As I wrote at the start of the coup, there is a feeling among Corbyn’s allies in the trade unions and Momentum that the leader’s offfice “fucked the first year and had to be rescued”, with Milne taking much of the blame. 

Senior figures in Momentum are keen for him to be replaced, while the TSSA, whose general secretary, Manuel Cortes, is one of Corbyn’s most reliable allies, is said to be keen for their man Sam Tarry to take post in the leader’s office on a semi-permanent basis. (Tarry won the respect of many generally hostile journalists when he served as campaign chief on the Corbyn re-election bid.) There have already been personnel changes at the behest of Corbyn-allied trade unions, with a designated speechwriter being brought in.

But Milne has seen off the attempt to remove him, with one source saying his critics had been “outplayed, again” and that any new hires will be designed to bolster, rather than replace Milne as comms chief. 

Milne, however, has found the last year a trial. I am reliably informed that he has been keeping a diary and is keen for the full story of the year to come out. With his place secure, he could leave “with his head held high”, rather than being forced out by his enemies and made a scapegoat for failures elsewhere, as friends fear he has been. The contents of the diary would also allow him to return in triumph to The Guardian rather than slinking back. 

So whether he decides to remain in the Corbyn camp or walk away, the Milne effect on Team Corbyn is set to endure.

 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.