Labour and Unite: how The Times misled its readers

Of the 14 Labour constituency parties placed under "special measures", just one, Falkirk West, was due to concerns over activity by Unite.

As the row over Unite's alleged manipulation of the Labour selection process in Falkirk intensifies (Jim Murphy, one of the shadow cabinet ministers criticised by Len McCluskey in my recent interview with him, declared earlier that the union had "well and truly over-stepped the mark"), today's Times front page reports that "Labour has seized control of 14 of its constituency parties as a result of attempts to manipulate selections and exert unfair influence." The tense and accompanying headline ("Labour forced to step in as union takes over key seats") suggest that, in addition to Falkirk, Ed Miliband has been forced to place other seats under "special measures" due to illegitimate union activity. 

But as a Labour source told me earlier, that's not the case at all. Twelve of the 14 seats were placed under special measures before 2005 and in just one instance (Falkirk West) was this due to concerns over Unite. As the Times finally concedes on p.4 (after eight paragraphs), "Falkirk is the only constituency on the list, which has never previously been made public, connected to union malpractice". 

Unite has made no secret of its (entirely reasonable) desire to see its members selected as Labour candidates. As McCluskey told me, "Because we’re having some success, suddenly these people are crying foul. Well I’m delighted to read it. I’m delighted when Blair and everyone else intervenes because it demonstrates that we are having an impact and an influence and we’ll continue to do so."

The allegations surrounding Falkirk certainly deserve to be taken seriously (as they have been) but it's important not to suggest that union campaigning is, by definition, illegitimate, a distinction the Times's report entirely failed to make. 

And here, courtesy of Labour List, are the 14 CLPS currently under special measures. 

  • Bethnal Green and Bow
  • Poplar and Limehouse
  • Brentford & Isleworth
  • Ealing Southall
  • Falkirk West
  • Feltham & Heston
  • Oldham East and Saddleworth
  • Oldham West and Royton
  • Birmingham Hall Green
  • Birmingham Hodge Hill
  • Birmingham Ladywood
  • Birmingham Perry Barr
  • Warley
  • Slough

 

Unite general secretary Len McCluskey addresses delegates at the TUC's annual congress. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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