The Home Office wants immigrants to be afraid

The most authoritarian of the government departments also has an authoritarian twitter account.

The Home Office is running a Twitter campaign warning illegal immigrants "there will be no hiding place". It seems to have slightly misjudged the tone, though, coming across as more like "authoritarian police state" than "doing a tough but necessary job":

 

 

 

 

A quick glance at the replies to the first tweet shows that it didn't go down too well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What really sticks, though, was the disconnect between the reasons given for the raid in the video and the footage shown. While immigration minister Mark Harper is talking about "substandard, overcrowded accommodation", the camera pans over… a small messy bedroom.

It's certainly substandard and overcrowded, but it's also a bedroom in a shared house in West London. The Home Office is basically using the South East's broken housing market to justify going Judge Dredd on immigrants.

Some replies to the Home Office account.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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