The Home Office wants immigrants to be afraid

The most authoritarian of the government departments also has an authoritarian twitter account.

The Home Office is running a Twitter campaign warning illegal immigrants "there will be no hiding place". It seems to have slightly misjudged the tone, though, coming across as more like "authoritarian police state" than "doing a tough but necessary job":

 

 

 

 

A quick glance at the replies to the first tweet shows that it didn't go down too well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What really sticks, though, was the disconnect between the reasons given for the raid in the video and the footage shown. While immigration minister Mark Harper is talking about "substandard, overcrowded accommodation", the camera pans over… a small messy bedroom.

It's certainly substandard and overcrowded, but it's also a bedroom in a shared house in West London. The Home Office is basically using the South East's broken housing market to justify going Judge Dredd on immigrants.

Some replies to the Home Office account.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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