The Home Office wants immigrants to be afraid

The most authoritarian of the government departments also has an authoritarian twitter account.

The Home Office is running a Twitter campaign warning illegal immigrants "there will be no hiding place". It seems to have slightly misjudged the tone, though, coming across as more like "authoritarian police state" than "doing a tough but necessary job":

 

 

 

 

A quick glance at the replies to the first tweet shows that it didn't go down too well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What really sticks, though, was the disconnect between the reasons given for the raid in the video and the footage shown. While immigration minister Mark Harper is talking about "substandard, overcrowded accommodation", the camera pans over… a small messy bedroom.

It's certainly substandard and overcrowded, but it's also a bedroom in a shared house in West London. The Home Office is basically using the South East's broken housing market to justify going Judge Dredd on immigrants.

Some replies to the Home Office account.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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#heterosexualprideday happened, and it’s rather depressing

It may have been a publicity stunt – but some of the responses are still worrying.

Waking up to the news Michael Gove would be running for the Tory premiership, I thought my daily share of bad news was out the way. Seeing "Heterosexual Pride Day" trending on Twitter made me think otherwise.

LGBT Pride Month in the United States is being celebrated throughout June, with many cities across the country celebrating pride events. Pride in London took place last weekend.

But the hashtag began in the US. This post, by @_JackNForTweets, appeared yesterday.

And despite the broad condemnation it elicited, some voiced their support of the hashtag.

The originator of the tweet later gloated about the furore it created.

Before firing off some more vitriol.

The timing, of course, is unsavoury. Not three weeks have passed since the deadly Orlando shooting – the worst in recent US history – in which 49 people were killed at an LGBT nightclub. In response to the attack, commemorative vigils were held around the world. 

Sensitivity to the specifically homophobic nature of the attack has been questioned within the media's coverage of the event. The day after the attack, Owen Jones walked out of Sky News interview.

Despite this, many have voiced their opposition to the hashtag.

Regardless of whether the hashtag was purely designed for clickbait, the more worrying thing is the traction of support it gained.