Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. Ed Balls was too prudent. We need full-throttle fury (Guardian)
    Labour's response to George Osborne's venomous attack on welfare and the poor was too cautious. Where is their passion, asks Polly Toynbee.
  2. Doreen Lawrence? Of course she was spied on (Independent)
    The usual response to anyone who questions the police is: “The innocent have nothing to fear.” How much more sodding innocent can you get than Doreen Lawrence, writes Mark Steel.
  3. Osborne's 'learn English or lose your benefits' is shameless scapegoating (Guardian)
    I work with migrants who are all desperate to learn English. The notion they are lazing and wasting our taxes isn't true, writes Ellie Mae O'Hagan.
  4. Britain needs an energy revolution – and quickly (Telegraph)
    The US is drilling tens of thousands of fracking wells every year - surely Britain could aim to reach at least a fraction of that total, writes the Telegraph in a leader.
  5. Cut the welfare bill. Pay people proper wages (Times)
    You can’t live a decent life on under £17,000 a year. Yet we expect those on the minimum wage to get by on far less, writes Philip Collins.
  6. Chin up, Mark Carney, things can’t get much worse (Telegraph)
    Disappoint? The new Governor of the Bank of England is more likely to succeed, writes Jeremy Warner.
  7. The leaders most likely to survive are those who will act on corruption and inequality (Financial Times)
    The leaders most likely to survive are those who will act on corruption and inequality, writes Philip Stephens.
  8. Build, build, build! Or rather, how dare you? (Times)
    Gaby Hinsliff recounts a battle with her inner Nimby.
  9. Britain let down by its bean-counting politicians (Financial Times)
    Ministers treat the economy as if it were a small shop writ large.
  10. A radical change to Tory immigration policy could transform 'shared values' into ethnic minority votes (Independent)
    It’s a cliché that many BME voters are naturally sympathetic to Conservative values, so why don't values make votes? An amnesty for illegal immigrants would make sense, writes Nadhim Zahawi.
Show Hide image

New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.