Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. Ed Balls was too prudent. We need full-throttle fury (Guardian)
    Labour's response to George Osborne's venomous attack on welfare and the poor was too cautious. Where is their passion, asks Polly Toynbee.
  2. Doreen Lawrence? Of course she was spied on (Independent)
    The usual response to anyone who questions the police is: “The innocent have nothing to fear.” How much more sodding innocent can you get than Doreen Lawrence, writes Mark Steel.
  3. Osborne's 'learn English or lose your benefits' is shameless scapegoating (Guardian)
    I work with migrants who are all desperate to learn English. The notion they are lazing and wasting our taxes isn't true, writes Ellie Mae O'Hagan.
  4. Britain needs an energy revolution – and quickly (Telegraph)
    The US is drilling tens of thousands of fracking wells every year - surely Britain could aim to reach at least a fraction of that total, writes the Telegraph in a leader.
  5. Cut the welfare bill. Pay people proper wages (Times)
    You can’t live a decent life on under £17,000 a year. Yet we expect those on the minimum wage to get by on far less, writes Philip Collins.
  6. Chin up, Mark Carney, things can’t get much worse (Telegraph)
    Disappoint? The new Governor of the Bank of England is more likely to succeed, writes Jeremy Warner.
  7. The leaders most likely to survive are those who will act on corruption and inequality (Financial Times)
    The leaders most likely to survive are those who will act on corruption and inequality, writes Philip Stephens.
  8. Build, build, build! Or rather, how dare you? (Times)
    Gaby Hinsliff recounts a battle with her inner Nimby.
  9. Britain let down by its bean-counting politicians (Financial Times)
    Ministers treat the economy as if it were a small shop writ large.
  10. A radical change to Tory immigration policy could transform 'shared values' into ethnic minority votes (Independent)
    It’s a cliché that many BME voters are naturally sympathetic to Conservative values, so why don't values make votes? An amnesty for illegal immigrants would make sense, writes Nadhim Zahawi.
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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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