Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. Why these cults of hate beguile the lost boys (Times)
    Whether it is radical Islam or street gangs, powerless, alienated teenagers need protection from false certainties, writes Janice Turner
  2. Tim Cook: Apple’s quiet leader (Financial Times)
    A defence of the tech group’s tax affairs has boosted the chief’s profile, writes Tim Bradshaw.
  3. Woolwich attack: When killers strike, should we listen to what they say? (Guardian)
    Just as Breivik's views on Islam did not deserve a hearing by the right, so the left should not use Woolwich to make its case on foreign policy, writes Jonathan Freedland.
  4. Dave must move against the Tory dark forces (Times)
    Every time the PM moves to the Right, they want more. Unless he makes an example of a malcontent he is doomed, writes Matthew Parris
  5. The West is fighting on behalf of ordinary Muslims – and winning (Telegraph)
    Our enemies are utterly misguided in their denunciation of Britain’s interventions overseas, writes Con Coughlin.
  6. Nigel Farage bombed in Edinburgh – what does that really tell us about Scottish antipathy to the English? (Guardian)
    It could be to do with class more than nationality, writes Ian Jack
  7. Dogma will always lead to murder. In the end, scepticism is the only answer (Independent)
    The Woolwich killers were certain that faith supported their actions, writes A C Grayling.
  8. The fate of Sally Bercow suggests it's all to easy to side with the baying mob (Telegraph)
    The ill-judged clamour over Lord McAlpine swept many of us to a false conclusion, writes Graeme Archer.
  9. Farewell, Shameless. Your heirs have work to do (Independent)
    The undeserving poor – the feckless, the workshy, the scrounging – are the exception, not the norm. If only our television screens reflected that, writes Owen Jones.
  10. Britain is at risk of creating another housing bubble (Financial Times)
    The chancellor should be working to build homes, not push prices up further, writes Chris Giles

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Tom Watson rouses Labour's conference as he comes out fighting

The party's deputy leader exhilarated delegates with his paean to the Blair and Brown years. 

Tom Watson is down but not out. After Jeremy Corbyn's second landslide victory, and weeks of threats against his position, Labour's deputy leader could have played it safe. Instead, he came out fighting. 

With Corbyn seated directly behind him, he declared: "I don't know why we've been focusing on what was wrong with the Blair and Brown governments for the last six years. But trashing our record is not the way to enhance our brand. We won't win elections like that! And we need to win elections!" As Watson won a standing ovation from the hall and the platform, the Labour leader remained motionless. When a heckler interjected, Watson riposted: "Jeremy, I don't think she got the unity memo." Labour delegates, many of whom hail from the pre-Corbyn era, lapped it up.

Though he warned against another challenge to the leader ("we can't afford to keep doing this"), he offered a starkly different account of the party's past and its future. He reaffirmed Labour's commitment to Nato ("a socialist construct"), with Corbyn left isolated as the platform applauded. The only reference to the leader came when Watson recalled his recent PMQs victory over grammar schools. There were dissenting voices (Watson was heckled as he praised Sadiq Khan for winning an election: "Just like Jeremy Corbyn!"). But one would never have guessed that this was the party which had just re-elected Corbyn. 

There was much more to Watson's speech than this: a fine comic riff on "Saturday's result" (Ed Balls on Strictly), a spirited attack on Theresa May's "ducking and diving; humming and hahing" and a cerebral account of the automation revolution. But it was his paean to Labour history that roused the conference as no other speaker has. 

The party's deputy channelled the spirit of both Hugh Gaitskell ("fight, and fight, and fight again to save the party we love") and his mentor Gordon Brown (emulating his trademark rollcall of New Labour achivements). With his voice cracking, Watson recalled when "from the sunny uplands of increasing prosperity social democratic government started to feel normal to the people of Britain". For Labour, a party that has never been further from power in recent decades, that truly was another age. But for a brief moment, Watson's tubthumper allowed Corbyn's vanquished opponents to relive it. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.