Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. Politics should be guided by principle, not populism (Guardian)
    Labour ought to resist 'the people', as heard through the Ukip megaphone. Convictions are popular too, as Thatcher showed, writes Roy Hattersley.
  2. Monsieur Normal has turned into Mr Bean (Times)
    France wants the bold action of a Bonaparte. Instead, it’s had a year of ‘creative vagueness’, writes Charles Bremner.
  3. The first important conservative thinker (Telegraph)
    Charles Moore reviews Jesse Norman's biography of Edmund Burke.
  4. If Boris Johnson is the answer to Ukip, Tories are asking the wrong question (Guardian)
    Cameron and his A-list have alienated swaths of voters. Until they understand how, Ukip will be the beneficiary, writes John Harris.
  5. When jihad is a lifestyle choice, it cannot last (Times)
    The lesson of Boston and Birmingham is that the new generation of fanatics is less committed, writes Peter Watson.
  6. The buck does not stop with Reinhart and Rogoff (Financial Times)
    Political leaders pushing austerity made their choice, then cast about for intellectual buttresses, writes former US Treasury secretary Lawrence Summers.
  7. Niall Ferguson's wrong to say child-free people care less about the world (Guardian)
    His remarks suggested that people who don't reproduce are selfish. In my experience it's parents who give up their principles, writes Julie Bindel.
  8. Syria’s tragedy can no longer be contained (Telegraph)
    The world needs to confront the implications of its inability to keep Syria’s horror within its frontiers, write the Telegraph's editors.
  9. Italy’s change from austerity is all talk (Financial Times)
    Germany will not accept a fiscal stimulus for the sake of southern European countries, writes Wolfgang Münchau.
  10. A common sense policy to create jobs and combat what ails Britain (Independent)
    Britain ought to be constructing 230,000 homes a year to meet the demand, writes Owen Jones.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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I believe only Yvette Cooper has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy Corbyn

All the recent polling suggests Andy Burnham is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy Corbyn, says Diana Johnson MP.

Tom Blenkinsop MP on the New Statesman website today says he is giving his second preference to Andy Burnham as he thinks that Andy has the best chance of beating Jeremy.

This is on the basis that if Yvette goes out first all her second preferences will swing behind Andy, whereas if Andy goes out first then his second preferences, due to the broad alliance he has created behind his campaign, will all or largely switch to the other male candidate, Jeremy.

Let's take a deep breath and try and think through what will be the effect of preferential voting in the Labour leadership.

First of all, it is very difficult to know how second preferences will switch. From my telephone canvassing there is some rather interesting voting going on, but I don't accept that Tom’s analysis is correct. I have certainly picked up growing support for Yvette in recent weeks.

In fact you can argue the reverse of Tom’s analysis is true – Andy has moved further away from the centre and, as a result, his pitch to those like Tom who are supporting Liz first is now narrower. As a result, Yvette is more likely to pick up those second preferences.

Stats from the Yvette For Labour team show Yvette picking up the majority of second preferences from all candidates – from the Progress wing supporting Liz to the softer left fans of Jeremy – and Andy's supporters too. Their figures show many undecideds opting for Yvette as their first preference, as well as others choosing to switch their first preference to Yvette from one of the other candidates. It's for this reason I still believe only Yvette has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy and then to go on to win in 2020.

It's interesting that Andy has not been willing to make it clear that second preferences should go to Yvette or Liz. Yvette has been very clear that she would encourage second preferences to be for Andy or Liz.

Having watched Andy on Sky's Murnaghan show this morning, he categorically states that Labour will not get beyond first base with the electorate at a general election if we are not economically credible and that fundamentally Jeremy's economic plans do not add up. So, I am unsure why Andy is so unwilling to be clear on second preferences.

All the recent polling suggests Andy is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy. He trails fourth in London – where a huge proportion of our electorate is based.

So I would urge Tom to reflect more widely on who is best placed to provide the strongest opposition to the Tories, appeal to the widest group of voters and reach out to the communities we need to win back. I believe that this has to be Yvette.

The Newsnight focus group a few days ago showed that Yvette is best placed to win back those former Labour voters we will need in 2020.

Labour will pay a massive price if we ignore this.

Diana Johnson is the Labour MP for Hull North.