Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. Politics should be guided by principle, not populism (Guardian)
    Labour ought to resist 'the people', as heard through the Ukip megaphone. Convictions are popular too, as Thatcher showed, writes Roy Hattersley.
  2. Monsieur Normal has turned into Mr Bean (Times)
    France wants the bold action of a Bonaparte. Instead, it’s had a year of ‘creative vagueness’, writes Charles Bremner.
  3. The first important conservative thinker (Telegraph)
    Charles Moore reviews Jesse Norman's biography of Edmund Burke.
  4. If Boris Johnson is the answer to Ukip, Tories are asking the wrong question (Guardian)
    Cameron and his A-list have alienated swaths of voters. Until they understand how, Ukip will be the beneficiary, writes John Harris.
  5. When jihad is a lifestyle choice, it cannot last (Times)
    The lesson of Boston and Birmingham is that the new generation of fanatics is less committed, writes Peter Watson.
  6. The buck does not stop with Reinhart and Rogoff (Financial Times)
    Political leaders pushing austerity made their choice, then cast about for intellectual buttresses, writes former US Treasury secretary Lawrence Summers.
  7. Niall Ferguson's wrong to say child-free people care less about the world (Guardian)
    His remarks suggested that people who don't reproduce are selfish. In my experience it's parents who give up their principles, writes Julie Bindel.
  8. Syria’s tragedy can no longer be contained (Telegraph)
    The world needs to confront the implications of its inability to keep Syria’s horror within its frontiers, write the Telegraph's editors.
  9. Italy’s change from austerity is all talk (Financial Times)
    Germany will not accept a fiscal stimulus for the sake of southern European countries, writes Wolfgang Münchau.
  10. A common sense policy to create jobs and combat what ails Britain (Independent)
    Britain ought to be constructing 230,000 homes a year to meet the demand, writes Owen Jones.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn turns "the nasty party" back on Theresa May

The Labour leader exploited Conservative splits over disability benefits.

It didn't take long for Theresa May to herald the Conservatives' Copeland by-election victory at PMQs (and one couldn't blame her). But Jeremy Corbyn swiftly brought her down to earth. The Labour leader denounced the government for "sneaking out" its decision to overrule a court judgement calling for Personal Independence Payments (PIPs) to be extended to those with severe mental health problems.

Rather than merely expressing his own outrage, Corbyn drew on that of others. He smartly quoted Tory backbencher Heidi Allen, one of the tax credit rebels, who has called on May to "think agan" and "honour" the court's rulings. The Prime Minister protested that the government was merely returning PIPs to their "original intention" and was already spending more than ever on those with mental health conditions. But Corbyn had more ammunition, denouncing Conservative policy chair George Freeman for his suggestion that those "taking pills" for anxiety aren't "really disabled". After May branded Labour "the nasty party" in her conference speech, Corbyn suggested that the Tories were once again worthy of her epithet.

May emphasised that Freeman had apologised and, as so often, warned that the "extra support" promised by Labour would be impossible without the "strong economy" guaranteed by the Conservatives. "The one thing we know about Labour is that they would bankrupt Britain," she declared. Unlike on previous occasions, Corbyn had a ready riposte, reminding the Tories that they had increased the national debt by more than every previous Labour government.

But May saved her jibe of choice for the end, recalling shadow cabinet minister Cat Smith's assertion that the Copeland result was an "incredible achivement" for her party. "I think that word actually sums up the Right Honourable Gentleman's leadership. In-cred-ible," May concluded, with a rather surreal Thatcher-esque flourish.

Yet many economists and EU experts say the same of her Brexit plan. Having repeatedly hailed the UK's "strong economy" (which has so far proved resilient), May had better hope that single market withdrawal does not wreck it. But on Brexit, as on disability benefits, it is Conservative rebels, not Corbyn, who will determine her fate.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.