Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. Politics should be guided by principle, not populism (Guardian)
    Labour ought to resist 'the people', as heard through the Ukip megaphone. Convictions are popular too, as Thatcher showed, writes Roy Hattersley.
  2. Monsieur Normal has turned into Mr Bean (Times)
    France wants the bold action of a Bonaparte. Instead, it’s had a year of ‘creative vagueness’, writes Charles Bremner.
  3. The first important conservative thinker (Telegraph)
    Charles Moore reviews Jesse Norman's biography of Edmund Burke.
  4. If Boris Johnson is the answer to Ukip, Tories are asking the wrong question (Guardian)
    Cameron and his A-list have alienated swaths of voters. Until they understand how, Ukip will be the beneficiary, writes John Harris.
  5. When jihad is a lifestyle choice, it cannot last (Times)
    The lesson of Boston and Birmingham is that the new generation of fanatics is less committed, writes Peter Watson.
  6. The buck does not stop with Reinhart and Rogoff (Financial Times)
    Political leaders pushing austerity made their choice, then cast about for intellectual buttresses, writes former US Treasury secretary Lawrence Summers.
  7. Niall Ferguson's wrong to say child-free people care less about the world (Guardian)
    His remarks suggested that people who don't reproduce are selfish. In my experience it's parents who give up their principles, writes Julie Bindel.
  8. Syria’s tragedy can no longer be contained (Telegraph)
    The world needs to confront the implications of its inability to keep Syria’s horror within its frontiers, write the Telegraph's editors.
  9. Italy’s change from austerity is all talk (Financial Times)
    Germany will not accept a fiscal stimulus for the sake of southern European countries, writes Wolfgang Münchau.
  10. A common sense policy to create jobs and combat what ails Britain (Independent)
    Britain ought to be constructing 230,000 homes a year to meet the demand, writes Owen Jones.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Donald Trump vs Barack Obama: How the inauguration speeches compared

We compared the two presidents on trade, foreign affairs and climate change – so you (really, really) don't have to.

After watching Donald Trump's inaugural address, what better way to get rid of the last few dregs of hope than by comparing what he said with Barack Obama's address from 2009? 

Both thanked the previous President, with Trump calling the Obamas "magnificent", and pledged to reform Washington, but the comparison ended there. 

Here is what each of them said: 

On American jobs

Obama:

The state of our economy calls for action, bold and swift.  And we will act, not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth.  We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together.  We'll restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost.  We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories.  And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age.

Trump:

For many decades we've enriched foreign industry at the expense of American industry, subsidized the armies of other countries while allowing for the very sad depletion of our military.

One by one, the factories shuttered and left our shores with not even a thought about the millions and millions of American workers that were left behind.

Obama had a plan for growth. Trump just blames the rest of the world...

On global warming

Obama:

With old friends and former foes, we'll work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet.

Trump:

On the Middle East:

Obama:

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society's ills on the West, know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. 

Trump:

We will re-enforce old alliances and form new ones and unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the earth.

On “greatness”

Obama:

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned.

Trump:

America will start winning again, winning like never before.

 

On trade

Obama:

This is the journey we continue today.  We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth.  Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began.  Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week, or last month, or last year.  Our capacity remains undiminished.  

Trump:

We must protect our borders from the ravages of other countries making our product, stealing our companies and destroying our jobs.

Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength. I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never ever let you down.

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland