Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. David Cameron won't prosper by trying to outkip the Kippers (Observer)
    Both the Tories and Labour have several reasons to be troubled by the Ukip surge – and one to be grateful for it, writes Andrew Rawnsley.
  2. Has the Conservative Party learnt any lessons from Ukip's success? (Sunday Telegraph)
    There has been a groundswell in the big world – the neglected majority of conservative voters has moved on, writes Janet Daley
  3. They’re all now making plans for Nigel (Sunday Times)
    UKIP has staked out its territory and it won’t be dislodged easily. Who is the joke on, asks Adam Boulton, and who are the pretenders now?
  4. When Nigel Farage's dream fades, it will be Dave who smiles (Independent on Sunday)
    The Tories will be also-rans in next year's European elections, but once reality dawns in 2015, it is Labour who will have most to worry about, writes John Rentoul.
  5. Fashion still doesn't give a damn about the deaths of garment workers (Observer)
    Lucy Siegle reports on a campaign launched this week aiming to ensure the tragedy in Bangladesh is a tipping point for both the industry and consumers.
  6. A decade that hushed up horror (Sunday Telegraph)
    We don't feel so nostalgic for the Seventies in the wake of these scandals, writes Jenny McCartney.
  7. Brutal Obama is shackled by his Guantanamo gulag (Sunday Times)
    Obama is now more brutal in his treatment of prisoners in a terrorist war than Thatcher, writes Andrew Sullivan.
  8. Our disbelief is the sexual predator's great asset (Independent on Sunday)
    The problem was not tolerance of abuse but disbelief of anyone who dared complain, writes Joan Smith
  9. Fruitcakes and closet racists? Cameron's talking about YOU! (**)
    It is now just a matter of time before the Tory Party dies, asserts Peter Hitchens.
  10. Worker Safety in Bangladesh and Beyond (New York Times)
    Lawmakers began improving industrial safety in earnest after the 1911 fire at New York’s Triangle Shirtwaist factory, which killed 146 workers and horrified the country. The collapse of Rana Plaza should play a similarly galvanizing role now, write the New York Times' editors.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.