Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. How can the Tories end their family feud with Ukip? (Guardian)
    Insulting Nigel Farage won't work, but David Cameron shouldn't impersonate him either. The answer is far subtler, writes Jonathan Freedland.
  2. What can David Cameron do? Have a referendum in this parliament (Telegraph)
    The Prime Minister David Cameron should be ready to leave the EU if he does not get the reforms he wants, writes Charles Moore.
  3. Farage aims to destroy sensible Toryism (Times)
    Cameron must energetically defend his vision of a moderate and outward-looking Conservative Party, writes Matthew Parris.
  4. Ukip’s victory will make all British political parties nervous (Financial Times)
    The role of Nigel Farage’s party is still more psychological than electoral, writes Janan Ganesh
  5. How to deal with a problem like Ukip? Take them head-on (Independent)
    Calling Farage's party racist allows it to play the victim card. So attack policies instead, writes James Moore
  6. There's only one way for Dave to stub out Farage (Daily Mail)
    Winning back UKIP voters might mean getting a new leader, and it would almost certainly involve breaking the Coalition, writes Simon Heffer.
  7. Syria: a roadmap to peace (Guardian)
    Syrians need a regional settlement that is owned by the region – and the UN security council must make that happen, writes former SDP leader David Owen.
  8. The cell door must slam shut on Stuart Hall (Telegraph)
    When the fate is decided of the former BBC presenter Stuart Hall, the mere passage of time should play no part, writes Matthew Norman.
  9. Feminism 2.0 is hot, rude and self-confident (Times)
    Revelations about 1970s sexual predators show why we needed feminism. In the age of internet porn we need it again, writes Janice Turner.
  10. Talk is cheap in the clampdown on tax avoidance (Financial Times)
    Even milder reforms will be hard to realise, writes Vanessa Houlder.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Watch: The evidence Nigel Farage said money sent to the EU should go to the NHS

After the EU referendum result, Nigel Farage said it was a "mistake" for Leave to suggest funds could go to the NHS. But what's this?

Remember Friday? (I know: it's not necessarily a pleasant thing to do, but bear with me.) On Friday, hours after the result of the EU referendum was announced, Nigel Farage appeared on Good Morning Britain and said that the Leave campaign advertising which linked the extra "£350m a week" Brexit would allegedly gift us with the NHS was a "mistake".

Sure, it was on posters, and emblazoned on a bus, and he didn't speak up to disabuse anyone of the notion. But let's give Farage the benefit of the doubt and pretend he does sorely regret the fact that, through no fault of his own, members of the electorate may have been led to believe that that money would be put into healthcare. It must be tough, when you ought to be high on your victory, to have to answer for other people's mistakes

Ah. Hold that thought.

It looks like the Independent has unearthed a video of Nigel Farage on television before the vote, and  strange thing  he tells Hilary Benn that the money currently being sent to Europe should be spent on, er, "schools, hospitals and the NHS".

Well, this mole isn't sure what to say. Maybe Farage doesn't remember this specific moment? Maybe when he said "schools, hospitals and the NHS" he actually meant something different, like "negotiating our exit from the EU", or "paying to access the common market despite no longer being a member"? Or maybe when he said that money should be spent on these things, he didn't mean it necessarily would be, and it would have been entirely unreasonable for the voting public to make such an absurd leap?

All I can suggest is that you watch and decide for yourself, dear reader.

I'm a mole, innit.