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Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

New Statesman
  1. How can the Tories end their family feud with Ukip? (Guardian)
    Insulting Nigel Farage won't work, but David Cameron shouldn't impersonate him either. The answer is far subtler, writes Jonathan Freedland.
  2. What can David Cameron do? Have a referendum in this parliament (Telegraph)
    The Prime Minister David Cameron should be ready to leave the EU if he does not get the reforms he wants, writes Charles Moore.
  3. Farage aims to destroy sensible Toryism (Times)
    Cameron must energetically defend his vision of a moderate and outward-looking Conservative Party, writes Matthew Parris.
  4. Ukip’s victory will make all British political parties nervous (Financial Times)
    The role of Nigel Farage’s party is still more psychological than electoral, writes Janan Ganesh
  5. How to deal with a problem like Ukip? Take them head-on (Independent)
    Calling Farage's party racist allows it to play the victim card. So attack policies instead, writes James Moore
  6. There's only one way for Dave to stub out Farage (Daily Mail)
    Winning back UKIP voters might mean getting a new leader, and it would almost certainly involve breaking the Coalition, writes Simon Heffer.
  7. Syria: a roadmap to peace (Guardian)
    Syrians need a regional settlement that is owned by the region – and the UN security council must make that happen, writes former SDP leader David Owen.
  8. The cell door must slam shut on Stuart Hall (Telegraph)
    When the fate is decided of the former BBC presenter Stuart Hall, the mere passage of time should play no part, writes Matthew Norman.
  9. Feminism 2.0 is hot, rude and self-confident (Times)
    Revelations about 1970s sexual predators show why we needed feminism. In the age of internet porn we need it again, writes Janice Turner.
  10. Talk is cheap in the clampdown on tax avoidance (Financial Times)
    Even milder reforms will be hard to realise, writes Vanessa Houlder.