Clegg hits back at Gove over claims of Lib Dem leadership plot

The Education Secretary "knows a thing or two about leadership ambitions", says Clegg on his LBC phone-in show.

There was an amusing moment on Nick Clegg's LBC phone-in show this morning when the Deputy PM was asked when he was going to slap down the "73-year-old Marxist" who wants to replace him as leader (Vince Cable, for the record, is 70). Clegg quipped in response, "his name is Cable, not Marx, or Lenin, or Trotsky", but added more seriously, "there is no leadership contest in the Liberal Democrats. I've been leading the party for several years and will continue to do so for some time", an answer that hardly reeked of self-confidence. 

When it was suggested that the caller was referring to Michael Gove's claim at the weekend that Clegg was blocking Tory policy due to "a campaign" against him by Cable's representative on earth, Lord Oakeshott, Clegg replied: 

The day that you rely on Michael Gove for insight into what goes on in the Liberal Democrats you will be lost in an impenetrable maze.

He mischievously added that Gove "knows a thing or two about leadership ambitions". Earlier this week, ConservativeHome editor Paul Goodman suggested that "with his brains, energy and fearlessness", the Education Secretary was "emerging as the real Conservative leader." But pick up this week's NS to read why Rafael thinks Gove is more likely to end up as Chancellor in a Boris Johnson-led government (don't say we didn't warn you). 

Nick Clegg leaves Number 10 Downing Street to attend Prime Minister's Questions. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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