Miliband makes his first major spending pledge: Labour won't cut the NHS

A Labour government would not consider "cutting the health service", says Miliband in his biggest post-2015 commitment.

Largely unnoticed by the media, Ed Miliband has made his first major spending commitment. Challenged by Nick Robinson on whether a Labour government would consider making cuts to the NHS, Miliband replied:

We're not going to be cutting the health service, I'm very clear about that. We will always be protecting the health service and will always make it a priority.

His decision to rule out cuts to the NHS, even at this early stage, is unsurprising. Polls show that it is the most popular spending area with voters and the above-average rate of inflation in the health service means it frequently requires real-terms rises just to stand still. With David Cameron and George Osborne making it clear that the Tories would continue to ring-fence the NHS after 2015, Labour has no intention of finding itself on the wrong side of this political divide. 

Miliband's pledge means that the Lib Dems are, once again, likely to go into the general election as the only party that would consider making cuts to health. Ahead of the 2015-16 Spending Review in June, Vince Cable has continued to argue that ring-fencing is not "a very sensible" long-term approach.

Ed Miliband said a Labour government would "always be protecting the health service". Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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What the "critical" UK terrorist threat level means

The security services believe that Salman Abedi, was not a lone operator but part of a wider cell.

Following the Manchester bombing, the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre (an inter-agency organisation comprised of 16 different agencies) has raised the UK's threat level from "Severe" to "Critical", the highest possible level.

What does that mean? It doesn't mean, as per some reports, that an attack is believed to be or is definitely imminent, but that one could be imminent.

It suggests that the security services believe that Salman Abedi, was not a lone operator but part of a wider cell that is still at large and may be planning further attacks. As the BBC's Dominic Casciani explains, one reason why attacks of this sort are rare is that they are hard to do without help, which can raise suspicions among counter-terrorism officials or bring would-be perpetrators into contact with people who are already being monitored by security services.

That, as the Times reports, Abedi recently returned from Libya suggests his was an attack that was either "enabled" - that is, he was provided with training and possibly material by international jihadist groups  - or "directed", as opposed to the activities of lone attackers, which are "inspired" by other attacks but not connected to a wider plot.

The hope is that, as with the elevated threat level in 2006 and 2007, it will last only a few days while Abedi's associates are located by the security services, as will the presence of the armed forces in lieu of armed police at selected locations like Parliament, cultural institutions and the like, designed to free up specialist police capacity.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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