Margaret Thatcher's funeral: images of the day

George Osborne sheds a tear and Cherie and Gordon meet again.

Banners are displayed outside Easington Colliery Club and Institute by former miners.

Spectators look on during the funeral.

Gordon Brown greets Cherie Blair.

Former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

Guests take their seats during the funeral at St Paul's Cathedral. 

David Cameron after reading from John 14. 1-6

George Osborne weeps during the Bishop of London's sermon. 

William Hague, Justine Thornton, Ed Miliband, Miriam González Durántez, Nick Clegg, Sarah Brown, Gordon Brown, Cherie Blair, Tony Blair, Norma Major, John Major, Samantha Cameron and David Cameron at the funeral.

The Bearer Party made up of personnel from the three branches of the military carry Margaret Thatcher's coffin.

Carol Thatcher, Marco Grass, Sarah Thatcher, Mark Thatcher, Michael Thatcher and Amanda Thatcher look on from the steps of St Paul's Cathedral as the coffin is placed in the hearse.

Margaret Thatcher's coffin is carried on a gun carriage drawn by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery as it arrives at St Paul's Cathedral. Photograph: Getty Images.
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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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