Anarchist group smashed window of Barnardo's for thing it didn't do

FAI claim Barnardo's "fund and administrate" a detention centre. Which they don't.

Via @jodelka on Twitter, the group which smashed the windows of a branch of Barnardo's in Brixton during the Monday night celebration of Margaret Thatcher's death has released a statement about why they did it. The "Informal Anarchist Federation (FAI)" writes on Indymedia:

On the celebration of Thatcher's death, we smashed a window of Barnardo's 'charity shop' in Brixton using a concrete slab from a bin on the street. And it was easy. We would of done more if it weren't for self-proclaimed pacifists violently attempting to arrest us.

This action was in solidarity with all migrants detained, deported and struggling to cross borders. Barnardo's was targeted because they fund and administrate Cedars detention centre in Croydon. They detain children, families and individuals who merely seek freedom from poverty, persecution, murder, rape and other oppression the borders.

Barnardo's do not, in fact "fund and administrate Cedars detention centre".

The group provides welfare services to children detained in the facility, which is officially "pre-departure accommodation" housing families due to be deported from the UK. A Barnardo's spokesperson told Civilsociety.co.uk:

Barnardo’s simply provides welfare and social work services there. We believe every family and child should be treated with dignity and respect and be able to access high-quality support.

There is a pressure group, Barnardo's Out, who feel that this is too much. When Barnardo's took the contract, the group set out seven "red lines" which would prompt it to "raise concerns… speak out and ultimately if we have to… withdraw our services", and Barnardo's Out argues that those red lines have been crossed without prompting action from the charity.

It should be noted that there's no hint of a direct link between Barnardo's Out and FAI. In fact, maybe if there was, the latter wouldn't have made quite such a ludicrous claim in their statement.

The smashed Barnardo's. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.