Revealed: how Osborne misled MPs over the deficit

The Chancellor said that borrowing was forecast to fall this year but the small print of the Office for Budget Responsibility document suggests otherwise.

Against expectations, George Osborne announced in his Budget speech that the deficit was forecast to fall "this year and next". He insisted that this was the case even if special factors (such as the transfer of the Royal Mail pension fund) are excluded. 

But scour the small print of the Office for Budget Responsibility document and it emerges that the Chancellor misled the House. As Table 4.36 shows, "excluding Royal Mail, APF and SLS transfers" (the final column), borrowing is forecast to rise from £121bn in 2011-12 to £123.2bn in 2012-13. As in last year's Autumn Statement, when he banked the 4G receipts early, Osborne has once again relied on smoke and mirrors to disguise his fiscal failings. 

This isn't mere pedantry; consistent deficit reduction is crucial to Osborne's narrative that "we're on the right track". But as the figures below show, that is far from the case. 

George Osborne poses for pictures outside 11 Downing Street in London before the Budget. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Word of the week: Michellania


Each week The Staggers will pick a new word to describe our uncharted political and socioeconomic territory. 

After brash Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump paraded his family at the national convention, the word of the week is:

Michellania (n)

A speech made of words and phrases gathered from different sources, such as Michelle Obama speeches and Rick Astley lyrics.

Usage: 

"I listened hard, but all I heard was michellania."

"Can you really tell the difference between all this michellania?"

"This michellania - you couldn't make it up."

Articles to read if you're sick of michellania:

Do you have a suggestion for next week's word? Share it in the form below.