Morning Call: pick of the papers

Ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

  1. What a difference an A makes to Osborne (Sunday Times)
    No wonder the chancellor’s pallor was even more evident than usual, writes Dominic Lawson.
  2. The BBC rot starts at the top, with the elusive Lord Patten (Sunday Telegraph)
    The chairman emerges smelling of roses, even as he sticks the knife into his juniors, says Peter Oborne.
  3. Revealed: George Osborne's master plan for reviving the UK economy (Observer)
    Tory MPs are agitating for a dramatic budget to transform their party's fortunes. They will be disappointed, writes Andrew Rawnsley.
  4. Only the Tories have a grip on energy (Sunday Telegraph)
    The voters of Eastleigh have a splendid opportunity to send a message that green fundamentalism is unaffordable, says the Sunday Telegraph in a leader column.
  5. In Italy, Illusion Is the Only Reality (New York Times)
    What is never countenanced in Italy is the notion that one has made very serious mistakes, writes Tim Parks.
  6. The harsh lives of the forgotten rural poor (Observer)
    Urban poverty is well documented, but those suffering in the countryside are almost invisible, says Tobias Jones.
  7. Don’t hang the jury, even if it’s hopeless (Sunday Times)
    Any who think the criminal law would be better off without juries should visit countries that have never had them, writes Geoffrey Roberston.
  8. Forget the triple A: It's the NUM (National Union of Ministers) that terrifies George (Mail on Sunday)
    Osborne's main enemy are Tory Ministers who don’t have an ideological objection to more cuts, but simply don’t want to have to make them to their own budgets, writes James Forsythe.
  9. The BBC must hack away the slack (Independent on Sunday)
    After the ghastly revelations of the past months, it's hard to believe the BBC still hasn't learnt the basic rules of PR, says Janet Street Porter.
  10. Libel law of diminishing returns (Sunday Times)
    The unamended Defamation Bill must be passed tomorrow, writes the Sunday Times in a leader article.
Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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