Morning Call: pick of the papers

The must-read comment and analysis from today's papers.

  1. Downgrade is Osborne's punishment for deficit-first policy (Guardian)
    "Without a tangible increase in the nation's annual income until after the next election, George Osborne's hopes of finding the money to cut the UK's £1tn of debt are in shreds", reads the Guardian's leader.
  2. The AAA downgrade may benefit Britain (Telegraph)
    If what we get is realism, then the price will be worth paying, says Thomas Pascoe.
  3. The UK is very European – in its mistakes (Financial Times)
    The delay in addressing economic problems is deepening them, writes Adam Posen.
  4. With this tax dodger list the Revenue shames only itself (Guardian)
    By singling out barbers and pipe fitters, HMRC shows it takes care of the little people, while Amazon looks after itself, writes Marina Hyde
  5. The politicians are losing in Eastleigh (Telegraph)
    Some in the press are calling this the most important by-election for 30 years. But important to whom?
  6. Weaker pound is welcome but no panacea (Financial Times)
    The challenge is to connect monetary and fiscal policy to promote demand while enhancing supply, writes Martin Wolf.
  7. Long live shopping. But the shop is dead (Times)
    Retail parks are already the past, doomed like high streets and markets. The internet changes how we buy and think, writes Matthew Parris
  8. Is downgrade bad news for Osborne? (Financial Times)
    "After the US was downgraded in 2011, US bond yields tumbled", says the Short View column.
  9. Sorry to harp on, but the horrors of Mid Staffs just won’t go away (Telegraph)
    The Prime Minister acknowledges the shame of the Amritsar massacre in India, but many more died on the NHS’s filthy wards, writes Charles Moore.
  10. Downgrade: good news for UK (Financial Times)
    All of the country’s problems are well documented, says Lex.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.