Morning Call: pick of the papers

The must-read comment and analysis from today's papers.

  1. Downgrade is Osborne's punishment for deficit-first policy (Guardian)
    "Without a tangible increase in the nation's annual income until after the next election, George Osborne's hopes of finding the money to cut the UK's £1tn of debt are in shreds", reads the Guardian's leader.
  2. The AAA downgrade may benefit Britain (Telegraph)
    If what we get is realism, then the price will be worth paying, says Thomas Pascoe.
  3. The UK is very European – in its mistakes (Financial Times)
    The delay in addressing economic problems is deepening them, writes Adam Posen.
  4. With this tax dodger list the Revenue shames only itself (Guardian)
    By singling out barbers and pipe fitters, HMRC shows it takes care of the little people, while Amazon looks after itself, writes Marina Hyde
  5. The politicians are losing in Eastleigh (Telegraph)
    Some in the press are calling this the most important by-election for 30 years. But important to whom?
  6. Weaker pound is welcome but no panacea (Financial Times)
    The challenge is to connect monetary and fiscal policy to promote demand while enhancing supply, writes Martin Wolf.
  7. Long live shopping. But the shop is dead (Times)
    Retail parks are already the past, doomed like high streets and markets. The internet changes how we buy and think, writes Matthew Parris
  8. Is downgrade bad news for Osborne? (Financial Times)
    "After the US was downgraded in 2011, US bond yields tumbled", says the Short View column.
  9. Sorry to harp on, but the horrors of Mid Staffs just won’t go away (Telegraph)
    The Prime Minister acknowledges the shame of the Amritsar massacre in India, but many more died on the NHS’s filthy wards, writes Charles Moore.
  10. Downgrade: good news for UK (Financial Times)
    All of the country’s problems are well documented, says Lex.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.