Morning Call: pick of the papers

The must-read comment and analysis from today's papers.

  1. Downgrade is Osborne's punishment for deficit-first policy (Guardian)
    "Without a tangible increase in the nation's annual income until after the next election, George Osborne's hopes of finding the money to cut the UK's £1tn of debt are in shreds", reads the Guardian's leader.
  2. The AAA downgrade may benefit Britain (Telegraph)
    If what we get is realism, then the price will be worth paying, says Thomas Pascoe.
  3. The UK is very European – in its mistakes (Financial Times)
    The delay in addressing economic problems is deepening them, writes Adam Posen.
  4. With this tax dodger list the Revenue shames only itself (Guardian)
    By singling out barbers and pipe fitters, HMRC shows it takes care of the little people, while Amazon looks after itself, writes Marina Hyde
  5. The politicians are losing in Eastleigh (Telegraph)
    Some in the press are calling this the most important by-election for 30 years. But important to whom?
  6. Weaker pound is welcome but no panacea (Financial Times)
    The challenge is to connect monetary and fiscal policy to promote demand while enhancing supply, writes Martin Wolf.
  7. Long live shopping. But the shop is dead (Times)
    Retail parks are already the past, doomed like high streets and markets. The internet changes how we buy and think, writes Matthew Parris
  8. Is downgrade bad news for Osborne? (Financial Times)
    "After the US was downgraded in 2011, US bond yields tumbled", says the Short View column.
  9. Sorry to harp on, but the horrors of Mid Staffs just won’t go away (Telegraph)
    The Prime Minister acknowledges the shame of the Amritsar massacre in India, but many more died on the NHS’s filthy wards, writes Charles Moore.
  10. Downgrade: good news for UK (Financial Times)
    All of the country’s problems are well documented, says Lex.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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PMQs review: Theresa May shows again that Brexit means hard Brexit

The Prime Minister's promise of "an end to free movement" is incompatible with single market membership. 

Theresa May, it is commonly said, has told us nothing about Brexit. At today's PMQs, Jeremy Corbyn ran with this line, demanding that May offer "some clarity". In response, as she has before, May stated what has become her defining aim: "an end to free movement". This vow makes a "hard Brexit" (or "chaotic Brexit" as Corbyn called it) all but inevitable. The EU regards the "four freedoms" (goods, capital, services and people) as indivisible and will not grant the UK an exemption. The risk of empowering eurosceptics elsewhere is too great. Only at the cost of leaving the single market will the UK regain control of immigration.

May sought to open up a dividing line by declaring that "the Labour Party wants to continue with free movement" (it has refused to rule out its continuation). "I want to deliver on the will of the British people, he is trying to frustrate the British people," she said. The problem is determining what the people's will is. Though polls show voters want control of free movement, they also show they want to maintain single market membership. It is not only Boris Johnson who is pro-having cake and pro-eating it. 

Corbyn later revealed that he had been "consulting the great philosophers" as to the meaning of Brexit (a possible explanation for the non-mention of Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith's resignation and May's Goldman Sachs speech). "All I can come up with is Baldrick, who says our cunning plan is to have no plan," he quipped. Without missing a beat, May replied: "I'm interested that [he] chose Baldrick, of course the actor playing Baldrick was a member of the Labour Party, as I recall." (Tony Robinson, a Corbyn critic ("crap leader"), later tweeted that he still is one). "We're going to deliver the best possible deal in goods and services and we're going to deliver an end to free movement," May continued. The problem for her is that the latter aim means that the "best possible deal" may be a long way from the best. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.