Mid Staffordshire "is a story of appalling and unnecessary suffering of hundreds of people"

Hospital staff and managers should be prosecuted if patients are harmed as a result of poor care, inquiry finds.

The Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry's report has been published today, and inquiry chair Robert Francis has made 290 recommendations as to how NHS culture can be changed to ensure that the years of abuse and neglect that occurred at Stafford Hospital can never happen again.

In a statement, Francis said: "This is a story of appalling and unnecessary suffering of hundreds of people." The priority of his report, he said, was not to find a scapegoat, but find ways of putting patients and the quality of care first.

According to BBC News, the chief recommendations of the report are:

  • The merger of the regulation of care into one body - two are currently involved
  • Senior managers to be given a code of conduct and the ability to disqualify them if they are not fit to hold such positions
  • Hiding information about poor care to become a criminal offence as would failing to adhere to basic standards that lead to death or serious harm
  • A statutory obligation on doctors and nurses for a duty of candour so they are open with patients about mistakes
  • An increased focus on compassion in the recruitment, training and education of nurses, including an aptitude test for new recruits and regular checks of competence as is being rolled out for doctors

David Cameron apologised for the failures during a statement on the report in the House of Commons this afternoon. He also confirmed that the new post of "chief inspector of hospitals" - in the manner of Ofsted - will be created.

Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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