Labour and Lib Dem MPs who voted against gay marriage: full list

Twenty two Labour MPs and four Liberal Democrat MPs voted against the equal marriage bill last night.

While all the attention was on the Conservatives, who voted in greater numbers against equal marriage (136 MPs) than in favour of it (127 MPs), a not insignificant number of Labour and Liberal Democrat MPs also opposed the bill. Twenty two Labour MPs voted against it, with sixteen abstaining, and four Lib Dems voted against it, with seven abstaining. Below is a full list of them. 

Based on the figures, 45 per cent of Tory MPs voted against the bill (58 per cent including abstentions), nine per cent of Labour MPs did (15 per cent including abstentions) and seven per cent of Lib Dem MPs did (20 per cent including abstentions).

Labour MPs who voted against equal marriage (22)

Joe Benton (Bootle)

Ronnie Campbell (Blyth Valley)

Tom Clarke (Coatbridge, Chryston & Bellshill)

Rosie Cooper (Lancashire West)

David Crausby (Bolton North East)

Tony Cunningham (Workington),

Jim Dobbin (Heywood & Middleton)

Brian Donohoe (Ayrshire Central)

Robert Flello (Stoke-on-Trent South)

Mary Glindon (Tyneside North)

Paul Goggins (Wythenshawe & Sale East)

Dai Havard (Merthyr Tydfil & Rhymney)

Michael McCann (East Kilbride, Strathaven & Lesmahagow)

Jim McGovern (Dundee West), Iain McKenzie (Inverclyde)

George Mudie (Leeds East)

Paul Murphy (Torfaen)

Stephen Pound (Ealing North)

Frank Roy (Motherwell & Wishaw)

Jim Sheridan (Paisley & Renfrewshire North)

Derek Twigg (Halton)

Mike Wood (Batley & Spen)

Liberal Democrat MPs who voted against equal marriage (4)

Sir Alan Beith (Berwick-upon-Tweed)

Gordon Birtwistle (Burnley)

John Pugh (Southport)

Sarah Teather (Brent Central)

Labour MPs who did not vote (16)

Dame Anne Begg (Aberdeen South)

Gordon Brown (Kirkcaldy & Cowdenbeath)

Alex Cunningham (Stockton North)

Bill Esterson (Sefton Central)

Pat Glass (Durham North West)

Roger Godsiff (Birmingham Hall Green)

David Heyes (Ashton Under Lyne)

Jim Hood (Lanark & Hamilton East)

Khalid Mahmood (Birmingham Perry Barr)

Michael Meacher (Oldham West & Royton)

Ian Mearns (Gateshead)

Yasmin Qureshi (Bolton South East)

Virendra Sharma (Ealing Southall)

Gavin Shuker (Luton South)

Stephen Timms (East Ham)

Shaun Woodward (St Helens South & Whiston)

Liberal Democrat MPs who did note vote (7)

Norman Baker (Lewes)

Martin Horwood (Cheltenham)

Charles Kennedy (Ross, Skye & Lochaber)

Greg Mulholland (Leeds North West)

John Thurso (Caithness, Sutherland & Easter Ross)

David Ward (Bradford East)

Jenny Willott (Cardiff Central)

Former children's minister Sarah Teather was one of four Liberal Democrat MPs to vote against equal marriage. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty Images
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The Fire Brigades Union reaffiliates to Labour - what does it mean?

Any union rejoining Labour will be welcomed by most in the party - but the impact on the party's internal politics will be smaller than you think.

The Fire Brigades Union (FBU) has voted to reaffiliate to the Labour party, in what is seen as a boost to Jeremy Corbyn. What does it mean for Labour’s internal politics?

Firstly, technically, the FBU has never affliated before as they are notionally part of the civil service - however, following the firefighters' strike in 2004, they decisively broke with Labour.

The main impact will be felt on the floor of Labour party conference. Although the FBU’s membership – at around 38,000 – is too small to have a material effect on the outcome of votes themselves, it will change the tenor of the motions put before party conference.

The FBU’s leadership is not only to the left of most unions in the Trades Union Congress (TUC), it is more inclined to bring motions relating to foreign affairs than other unions with similar politics (it is more internationalist in focus than, say, the PCS, another union that may affiliate due to Corbyn’s leadership). Motions on Israel/Palestine, the nuclear deterrent, and other issues, will find more support from FBU delegates than it has from other affiliated trade unions.

In terms of the balance of power between the affiliated unions themselves, the FBU’s re-entry into Labour politics is unlikely to be much of a gamechanger. Trade union positions, elected by trade union delegates at conference, are unlikely to be moved leftwards by the reaffiliation of the FBU. Unite, the GMB, Unison and Usdaw are all large enough to all-but-guarantee themselves a seat around the NEC. Community, a small centrist union, has already lost its place on the NEC in favour of the bakers’ union, which is more aligned to Tom Watson than Jeremy Corbyn.

Matt Wrack, the FBU’s General Secretary, will be a genuine ally to Corbyn and John McDonnell. Len McCluskey and Dave Prentis were both bounced into endorsing Corbyn by their executives and did so less than wholeheartedly. Tim Roache, the newly-elected General Secretary of the GMB, has publicly supported Corbyn but is seen as a more moderate voice at the TUC. Only Dave Ward of the Communication Workers’ Union, who lent staff and resources to both Corbyn’s campaign team and to the parliamentary staff of Corbyn and McDonnell, is truly on side.

The impact of reaffiliation may be felt more keenly in local parties. The FBU’s membership looks small in real terms compared Unite and Unison have memberships of over a million, while the GMB and Usdaw are around the half-a-million mark, but is much more impressive when you consider that there are just 48,000 firefighters in Britain. This may make them more likely to participate in internal elections than other affiliated trade unionists, just 60,000 of whom voted in the Labour leadership election in 2015. However, it is worth noting that it is statistically unlikely most firefighters are Corbynites - those that are will mostly have already joined themselves. The affiliation, while a morale boost for many in the Labour party, is unlikely to prove as significant to the direction of the party as the outcome of Unison’s general secretary election or the struggle for power at the top of Unite in 2018. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.