Jury discharged in Vicky Pryce trial

Unable to reach a verdict.

The jury has been discharged in the Vicky Pryce trial, as it was unable to come to a verdict.

Pryce is accused of perverting the course of justice by taking speeding points for her ex-husband, the former Lib Dem cabinet minister Chris Huhne.

Earlier, the judge had said he would accept a majority, rather than a unanimous, verdict.

The jury's questions to the judge, and the judge's clarifications, make for quite lively reading. In answer to a question about whether "religious conviction be a good enough reason for a wife feeling she had no choice" but to obey her husband, Mr Justice Sweeney wrote:

This is not, with respect, a question about this case at all. Vicky Pryce does not say that any such reason formed any part of her decision to do what she did. Answering this question will not help you in any way whatsoever to reach a true verdict in this case. I must direct you firmly to focus on the real issues in this case.”

I want to repeat the absolutely vital importance of your following my directions of law to the letter and the fact that it is an equally important part of each of your individual duties to ensure that all of you do follow my directions of law to the letter.

NS legal correspondent David Allen Green has been discussing on Twitter what happens next:

 

A retrial has been scheduled for Monday.

Vicky Pryce arrivng at Southwark Crown Court. Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.