How Tory by-election candidate Maria Hutchings attacked asylum seekers

The Conservative candidate for the Eastleigh by-election said in 2005: "I don't care about refugees".

The Conservatives' decision to select Maria Hutchings as their candidate for this month's Eastleigh by-election is not one that has been well received by all in the party. As one of Cameron's "A-list" candidates, Hutchings fought and lost the seat in 2010 (Chris Huhne increased his majority from 568 to 3,864) having risen to public attention following her ambushing of Tony Blair live on TV in 2005. To many Tories, she is exactly the kind of political novice that the party should avoid. 

But Hutchings's lack of experience is not the only problem for the Tories; there's also her past bigotry towards immigrants and asylum seekers. After attacking Blair over an alleged plan to close the special needs school her autistic son attended in Essex (Conservative-run Essex County Council later confirmed that no such plan existed), Hutchings was interviewed several times and had the following to say.

With an increasing number of immigrants and asylum seekers then the pot is reduced for the rest of us.

Mr Blair has got to stop focusing on issues around the world such as Afghanistan and Aids in Africa and concentrate on the issues that affect the people of Middle England, like myself who pay the taxes which keep the country going.

In another interview she remarked: 

I don't care about refugees. I care about my little boy and I want the treatment he deserves.

Given David Cameron's commitment to international development and the coalition's plan to increase aid spending from £8.65bn (0.56 per cent of GDP) this year to £11.7bn (0.7 per cent of GDP) in 2014-15, one wonders what Hutchings makes of Cameron's approach. 

If she regrets her 2005 comments, she should at least be required to say so. And if she doesn't, is there really room for her in the "modern, compassionate" Conservative Party that Cameron aspires to build? 

Conservative Eastleigh by-election candidate Maria Hutchings addresses the media at the Conservative headquarters in 2005. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.