How Clegg changed his line on Rennard's resignation

After previously suggesting that the Lib Dem chief executive resigned on "health grounds" alone, Clegg admits that concerns over his "inappropriate behaviour" were "in the background".

In his statement on Sunday night, Nick Clegg pointedly noted that Chris Rennard resigned as Liberal Democrat chief executive in 2009 on "health grounds". The implicit suggestion was that Rennard's departure was unrelated to the concerns raised over his behaviour towards female staff. 

But on his phone-in show on LBC radio this morning, the Deputy Prime Minister changed his line. He told presenter Nick Ferrari: "His health was poor and that was the immediate reason he left but of course these things [the concerns over Rennard's behaviour] were in the background." When Channel 4 News's Cathy Newman called into the programme and highlighted this inconsistency, Clegg repeated: "He left on health grounds but of course the issues of his inappropriate behaviour were in the background, of course they were". 

The questions the Deputy PM will need to answer are why he previously sought to give the impression that Rennard's resignation was on health grounds alone and why, if his "inappropriate beaviour" was a factor in his departure, the former chief executive was allowed to return to a senior role in the party as a member of its federal policy committee. 

Update: Here's the moment that "Cathy in Dulwich" called Clegg. 

Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg leaves his home on February 27, 2013 in London. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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