No early poll bounce for the Tories from Cameron's EU speech

First poll since Cameron's EU referendum pledge shows Labour's lead has risen two points to 12.

One of the hopes among the Tories is that David Cameron's promise of an EU referendum, like his "veto" of the EU fiscal compact in December 2011, will win the party a poll bounce. This is not just because it could persuade those eurosceptic voters who currently support Ukip or who "don't know" how they'd vote to back the Conservatives but also because it could lead swing voters to view Cameron as a strong and decisive leader. 

However, the first YouGov poll since the Prime Minister's speech, the fieldwork for which was conducted between 5pm on Tuesday and 5pm yesterday, shows no sign of an early boost for the Tories. Instead, support for Labour has risen by two points to 43 per cent, while the Tories are unchanged on 31 per cent. We will, of course, need to wait until the weekend polls for a clear picture of what effect, if any, Cameron's speech has had on the Conservatives' standing. 

But given how well trailed the speech was and the favourable coverage it received yesterday morning from Fleet Street, there will be some Tories disappointed that there has been no early shift in support. However, as I explained yesterday, it would not be surprising if Cameron's speech failed to move the polls. At present, just six per cent of voters regard the EU as one of the most "important issues" facing Britain. The news of Cameron's referendum pledge was only the tenth most-read story on the BBC website yesterday. To win the next election, the Tories need to talk about growth, jobs, public services and crime - the issues that actually matter to most people. Now let's see what the numbers look like after the weekend.

David Cameron delivers his speech on the UK's relationship with the EU at Bloomberg's headquarters in London. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.