No early poll bounce for the Tories from Cameron's EU speech

First poll since Cameron's EU referendum pledge shows Labour's lead has risen two points to 12.

One of the hopes among the Tories is that David Cameron's promise of an EU referendum, like his "veto" of the EU fiscal compact in December 2011, will win the party a poll bounce. This is not just because it could persuade those eurosceptic voters who currently support Ukip or who "don't know" how they'd vote to back the Conservatives but also because it could lead swing voters to view Cameron as a strong and decisive leader. 

However, the first YouGov poll since the Prime Minister's speech, the fieldwork for which was conducted between 5pm on Tuesday and 5pm yesterday, shows no sign of an early boost for the Tories. Instead, support for Labour has risen by two points to 43 per cent, while the Tories are unchanged on 31 per cent. We will, of course, need to wait until the weekend polls for a clear picture of what effect, if any, Cameron's speech has had on the Conservatives' standing. 

But given how well trailed the speech was and the favourable coverage it received yesterday morning from Fleet Street, there will be some Tories disappointed that there has been no early shift in support. However, as I explained yesterday, it would not be surprising if Cameron's speech failed to move the polls. At present, just six per cent of voters regard the EU as one of the most "important issues" facing Britain. The news of Cameron's referendum pledge was only the tenth most-read story on the BBC website yesterday. To win the next election, the Tories need to talk about growth, jobs, public services and crime - the issues that actually matter to most people. Now let's see what the numbers look like after the weekend.

David Cameron delivers his speech on the UK's relationship with the EU at Bloomberg's headquarters in London. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.