Nick Clegg: Coalition's infrastructure spending cut was a mistake

The Liberal Democrat leader tells The House magazine that he is "self-critical" - and that the Tory demand for an EU referendum isn't a deal-breaker in future referendum negotiations.

Labour will be quick to pounce on an admission by Nick Clegg that the coalition made a mistake in cutting capital spending. The Liberal Democrat leader told the House magazine:

If I'm going to be sort of self-critical, there was this reduction in capital spending when we came into the Coalition Government But I think we've all realised that you actually need, in order to foster a recovery, to try and mobilise as much public and private capital into infrastructure as possible.

He added that the Tory policy of offering an in-out referendum on EU membership would not be a "deal breaker" in future coalition negotiations:

Every party will have their positions on Europe at the 2015 general election, and like everybody else, if there's a Coalition, the parties will need to compare notes and work out what goes in the Coalition agreement.

In response, Labour treasury minister Rachel Reeves told ITV:

This is the first admission that this Government has made serious mistakes on the economy. But the real question is what Nick Clegg’s Government is going to do about it. We have urged Ministers to bring forward infrastructure investment and build thousands more homes, but they have refused to listen.

Nick Clegg. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.