Nick Clegg: Coalition's infrastructure spending cut was a mistake

The Liberal Democrat leader tells The House magazine that he is "self-critical" - and that the Tory demand for an EU referendum isn't a deal-breaker in future referendum negotiations.

Labour will be quick to pounce on an admission by Nick Clegg that the coalition made a mistake in cutting capital spending. The Liberal Democrat leader told the House magazine:

If I'm going to be sort of self-critical, there was this reduction in capital spending when we came into the Coalition Government But I think we've all realised that you actually need, in order to foster a recovery, to try and mobilise as much public and private capital into infrastructure as possible.

He added that the Tory policy of offering an in-out referendum on EU membership would not be a "deal breaker" in future coalition negotiations:

Every party will have their positions on Europe at the 2015 general election, and like everybody else, if there's a Coalition, the parties will need to compare notes and work out what goes in the Coalition agreement.

In response, Labour treasury minister Rachel Reeves told ITV:

This is the first admission that this Government has made serious mistakes on the economy. But the real question is what Nick Clegg’s Government is going to do about it. We have urged Ministers to bring forward infrastructure investment and build thousands more homes, but they have refused to listen.

Nick Clegg. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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