Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1.Cameron's speech told Europe's emperors to get dressed (Guardian)
The EU's elder statesmen tried to run before they could walk. We may not like it, but Cameron's call was brave and timely, writes Simon Jenkins

2.Cameron leaps into the unknown (Financial Times)
PM’s speech was a gamble to get the eurosceptic monkey off his back, writes Paul Goodman.

3.The Shard is the height of fashion, so could we live in a tower block? (Independent)
High-rises suffer from a bad reputation, but they can be more comfortable for occupants than ground-floor living.

4.If Gove axes AS-levels, equality will feel the blow (Guardian)
Modular courses and retakes help students in struggling schools bridge the gap between GCSE and A-level, argues Franklyn Addo.

5.The Labour Party will do anything for the workers – except trust them (Telegraph)
While David Cameron puts his faith in the people, Ed Miliband clings rigidly to belief in the state, writes Fraser Nelson.

6.World is right to worry about US debt (Financial Times)
America must face up to its responsibilities, writes Kenneth Rogoff

7.A Lib-Lab Coalition could be back on - if only Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband can bear to bury the hatchet (Independent)
David Cameron's offer of an In/Out referendum both reduces the chance of a future Tory-Lib coalition and the likelihood of a Tory majority government, argues John Kampfner.

8.Orwell endures because his nightmares do too (Times)
Fanatics in Mali, Syria and Iran prove the timeless truth of his words on the horrors of unrestrained power, writes Philip Collins

9.David Cameron may have finished off the Tories – but he had no choice (Telegraph)
EU referendum: David Cameron's Conservative Party gamble over Europe has been tried before, by Labour. It fatally split the party, explains Peter Oborne

10.Britain: a boarded-up high street of mediocrity (Times)
Despite the pound being on the slide Britain remains depressingly uncompetitive, writes Stephen King.

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Political video has come full circle in Obama and Clinton’s mockumentary-style films

Political campaign videos are increasingly mimicking the specific styles of filmmaking created to mock them.

This week, Hillary Clinton released a campaign video featuring Barack Obama, in an attempt to persuade her supporters to vote early. It revolved around Obama’s self-professed earliness. “I’m always early,” he tells us, cheerily. Aides chip in to explain this irritating habit, which becomes progressively more exaggerated, his approach to timing absurd. “You know how you beat LeBron James one-on-one? Get there 45 minutes early. Then it’s one-on-none.” A former staffer sighs. “You try telling the President of the United States there’s no such thing as a one-on-none.”

This is an instantly recognisable mockumentary style – deliberately shakey camerawork, complete with lots of zooming in and out, as absurd corporate behaviour is interspersed with incredulous talking heads and voiceover. It has its roots in the Office UK, taking the States by storm with The Office US, 30 Rock and Modern Family, and developing a political subgenre in The Thick of It, In the Loop and, most recently, Parks and Recreation. (Vague comparisons between Clinton and Poehler’s Leslie Knope abound.)

The content, too, seems familiar – a politician talks to camera about a personality quirk that is broadly a strength for someone in government, but exaggerates it to create a geeky, optimistic goofball, and a pretty likeable character. Take Leslie Knope on never smoking weed:

In terms of style and content, they’re fairly indistinguishable. And this not the only Clinton campaign video influenced by mockumentary and comedy tropes . In March, the Clinton campaigned released a “mean tweets” video with Senator Al Franken in the style of a Jimmy Kimmel Live talking head. Three days ago, a video campaign starring “Fake Lawyer” Josh Charles, an actor on The Good Wife, was released. It borrows heavily from mockumentary styles as well as self-mocking celebrity cameos in advertising. Even some non-comic videos, like this lighthearted one about Clinton’s granddaughter, have the exaggerated camerawork of the genre.

Of course, we can trace these campaign videos back to Obama again. His campaigns have always been heavily video based, and he’s taken the piss out of himself for Buzzfeed to promote campaigns. But the White House’s official channels are also in on the joke. In 2013, they released a mockumentary starring Steven Spielberg and 30 Rock’s Tracey Morgan, in which Obama plays Daniel Day Lewis playing Obama.

Earlier this year, the channel released another mini mockumentary, featuring Obama preparing for the end of his time as president. (The film even ridicules a less self-aware style of video – Obama posts a misjudged Snapchat about Obamacare, and asks “Did it get a lot of views at least?”)

A politician whose ideal evening consists of children’s movie marathons with colleagues? Where have we seen that before? Yes, political video has come full circle. Personally, I’m waiting on the Hillary Clinton break dancing clip

Anna Leszkiewicz is a pop culture writer at the New Statesman.