Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1.Cameron's speech told Europe's emperors to get dressed (Guardian)
The EU's elder statesmen tried to run before they could walk. We may not like it, but Cameron's call was brave and timely, writes Simon Jenkins

2.Cameron leaps into the unknown (Financial Times)
PM’s speech was a gamble to get the eurosceptic monkey off his back, writes Paul Goodman.

3.The Shard is the height of fashion, so could we live in a tower block? (Independent)
High-rises suffer from a bad reputation, but they can be more comfortable for occupants than ground-floor living.

4.If Gove axes AS-levels, equality will feel the blow (Guardian)
Modular courses and retakes help students in struggling schools bridge the gap between GCSE and A-level, argues Franklyn Addo.

5.The Labour Party will do anything for the workers – except trust them (Telegraph)
While David Cameron puts his faith in the people, Ed Miliband clings rigidly to belief in the state, writes Fraser Nelson.

6.World is right to worry about US debt (Financial Times)
America must face up to its responsibilities, writes Kenneth Rogoff

7.A Lib-Lab Coalition could be back on - if only Nick Clegg and Ed Miliband can bear to bury the hatchet (Independent)
David Cameron's offer of an In/Out referendum both reduces the chance of a future Tory-Lib coalition and the likelihood of a Tory majority government, argues John Kampfner.

8.Orwell endures because his nightmares do too (Times)
Fanatics in Mali, Syria and Iran prove the timeless truth of his words on the horrors of unrestrained power, writes Philip Collins

9.David Cameron may have finished off the Tories – but he had no choice (Telegraph)
EU referendum: David Cameron's Conservative Party gamble over Europe has been tried before, by Labour. It fatally split the party, explains Peter Oborne

10.Britain: a boarded-up high street of mediocrity (Times)
Despite the pound being on the slide Britain remains depressingly uncompetitive, writes Stephen King.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.