Gabrielle Giffords on gun violence: "Too many children are dying... We must do something."

The former Democratic Congresswoman, who was severely injured after being shot in the head at a political rally in 2011, delivered a moving speech at the start of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gun violence.

"Speaking is difficult, but I need to say something important. Violence is a big problem. Too many children are dying; too many children. We must do something. It will be hard. But the time is now. You must act. Be bold. Be courageous. Americans are counting on you."

Speaking slowly, speech clearly still incredibly difficult for her, Gabrielle Giffords delivered what should be a powerful and lasting message about the importance for America to act on gun control. She opened yesterday's Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gun violence - her words even more arresting because she herself was the victim of a shooting in 2011 that left her partially blind and paralysed in her right arm. As a former Democratic Representative, her exhortation that this is an important conversation "for Democrats; for Republicans" is a timely reminder of how important bipartisanship will be if any meaningful steps are to be taken on gun control. Watch her speech in full:

Later on, the hearing heard evidence from National Rifle Association (NRA) executive vice-president Wayne LaPierre, who stuck to his organisation's position that "law-abiding gun owners will not accept blame for the acts of violent or deranged criminals". He came under fire from Democrat members of the committee though, being forced to admit that while in 1999 the NRA supported the idea of mandatory background checks for people trying to buy guns, it had since relaxed its position. Giffords' husband, Mark Kelly, pointed out what a difference such checks could make, saying "My wife would not have been sitting in that seat today if we had had stronger background checks".

Editor's note: this article was updated - Giffords was a Democratic Representative, not a Republican as previously stated.

Gabrielle Giffords with her husband Mark Kelly at the hearing. Photograph: Getty Images

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

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Benn vs McDonnell: how Brexit has exposed the fight over Labour's party machine

In the wake of Brexit, should Labour MPs listen more closely to voters, or their own party members?

Two Labour MPs on primetime TV. Two prominent politicians ruling themselves out of a Labour leadership contest. But that was as far as the similarity went.

Hilary Benn was speaking hours after he resigned - or was sacked - from the Shadow Cabinet. He described Jeremy Corbyn as a "good and decent man" but not a leader.

Framing his overnight removal as a matter of conscience, Benn told the BBC's Andrew Marr: "I no longer have confidence in him [Corbyn] and I think the right thing to do would be for him to take that decision."

In Benn's view, diehard leftie pin ups do not go down well in the real world, or on the ballot papers of middle England. 

But while Benn may be drawing on a New Labour truism, this in turn rests on the assumption that voters matter more than the party members when it comes to winning elections.

That assumption was contested moments later by Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell.

Dismissive of the personal appeal of Shadow Cabinet ministers - "we can replace them" - McDonnell's message was that Labour under Corbyn had rejuvenated its electoral machine.

Pointing to success in by-elections and the London mayoral election, McDonnell warned would-be rebels: "Who is sovereign in our party? The people who are soverign are the party members. 

"I'm saying respect the party members. And in that way we can hold together and win the next election."

Indeed, nearly a year on from Corbyn's surprise election to the Labour leadership, it is worth remembering he captured nearly 60% of the 400,000 votes cast. Momentum, the grassroots organisation formed in the wake of his success, now has more than 50 branches around the country.

Come the next election, it will be these grassroots members who will knock on doors, hand out leaflets and perhaps even threaten to deselect MPs.

The question for wavering Labour MPs will be whether what they trust more - their own connection with voters, or this potentially unbiddable party machine.