Cameron promotes Lord Hill: the minister who tried to resign

Lord Hill, the minister who Cameron wouldn't listen to, replaces Lord Strathclyde as leader of the House of Lords.

If a cabinet minister intends to resign, it might be wise not to announce the news of their departure on the day of the government's "relaunch". But that's exactly what Downing Street has done. It emerged earlier today that Lord Strathclyde, who has sat on the Conservative frontbench for 25 years, has resigned as leader of the House of Lords. Given that David Cameron was informed of Strathclyde's intentions over the new year, it's surprising that the announcement was not made earlier (or later).

Amusingly, Strathclyde's replacement is Lord Hill, the Tory education minister who infamously tried - and failed - to resign at the last reshuffle after a distracted Cameron simply told him to "carry on the good work". In a memorable passage in his conference speech, Ed Miliband cited the affair as further evidence of the Prime Minister's incompetence.

There is even a bloke, and I think they call him Lord Hill who went to see the Prime Minister. He made an appointment during the last reshuffle in order to resign. But David Cameron was too incompetent to notice that he wanted to resign. So Lord Hill is still in the Government. This lot are so useless they can’t even resign properly.

With Hill now promoted to the cabinet, expect Miliband to make further light of the incident at this week's PMQs.

Lord Hill's attempt to resign as education minister failed after a distracted David Cameron didn't hear his threat.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty Images
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Telegraph fires environmental journalist Geoffrey Lean

Some have suggested the move is due to the newspapers' scepticism about man-made climate change. 

Geoffrey Lean, the respected enviromental commentator and reporter, has been "pushed out" of the Telegraph, according to the writer. Lean, who pioneered the role of environmental correspondent almost forty years, joined the Telegraph in 2009 after 16 years at the Independent. "Telegraph is pushing me out," Lean tweeted a few days ago. The Telegraph's International Business Editor, Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, tweeted "Departure of climate veteran @GeoffreyLean v sad for Telegraph colleagues. Conservative newspaper has lost a tireless voice for conservation". 

The loss of the respected Lean, some believe, is due to his longstanding support for the idea that climate change is manmade. 

I'm a mole, innit.