Cameron to deliver EU speech in the Netherlands this Friday

Downing Street confirms a date for the PM's long-delayed speech on "the future of the EU and the UK's relationship with it".

After months of speculation, Downing Street has finally confirmed a date for David Cameron's EU speech. The PM will deliver his long-delayed address on "the future of the EU and the UK's relationship with it" in the Netherlands this Friday. Cameron originally intended to give the speech on 22 January but was forced to change the date after Angela Merkel's office complained that it clashed with celebrations to mark the 50th anniversary of the Élysée Treaty (or Treaty of Friendship) between France and Germany.

Tory MPs were promised an address from Cameron on Europe as long ago as last June but when the speech failed to materialise, this was changed to "before Christmas". When this deadline too was missed, Cameron ill-advisedly remarked at a press gallery lunch in Westminster: "Thanks for reminding me that my Europe speech remains as yet unmade. This is a tantric approach to policy-making: it’ll be even better when it does eventually come."

The PM has now raised expectations so high that he will struggle to meet them. It is clear that Cameron will pledge to seek the repatriation of powers from the EU before offering voters a choice between this "new settlement" and withdrawal in a referendum midway through the next parliament. But to satisfy Tory MPs he will also need to show that he has a plan ready if other EU members refuse to play ball.

David Cameron leaves Number 10 Downing Street. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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