Boris Johnson: Drop the hair shirt approach, George Osborne

In the wake of the negative GDP figures, the London mayor joins the chorus of voices questioning austerity.

Et tu, Boris? On Thursday, Nick Clegg stuck the knife into George Osborne's reputation for economic strategy by declaring that the coalition had cut capital spending too harshly in its early days.

Yesterday, in the wake of GDP figures showing the economy shrank by 0.3 per cent in the final quarter of 2012 - pushing Britain closer to a triple-dip recession - Boris Johnson also publicly questioned the Chancellor's appraoch.

From Davos, he said it was time to "junk the rhetoric of austerity" in favour of boosting jobs and growth. "The single biggest inhibitor of demand is lack of confidence. If only some of the people in this room would invest some of the cash in their balance sheets we would see that confidence rewarded in a virtuous circle."

Johnson carefully moderated his criticisms by ostensibly directing them at the Bank of England, saying:

"There is huge potential in the UK. It is important we have the spirit of confidence. Some of the mutterings from Threadneedle Street are not the stuff to give the troops. We need investment in housing and transport, things that make a big difference."

While he supported Osborne's deficit-reduction plan, Johnson said he wanted more investment in growth-boosting infrastructure measures. He added that "the hair-shirt, Stafford Cripps agenda is not the way to get Britain moving again".

In the near future, the Guardian reports, Johnson's new economic adviser Gerard Lyons will publish the Mayor's "seven-point plan" for London, which includes building a new airport and hundreds of thousands of homes, as well as investing in transport infrastructure. 

Boris Johnson. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.