Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from today's papers.

  1. I wish I had trusted my instincts on Plebgate (Times)
    Matthew Parris examines the abuse of police authority which led to Andrew Mitchell's smearing.
  2. Cheer up. All this doom and gloom plays into the Tories' hands (Guardian)
    If the idea that we're all screwed takes hold, the Conservatives will end up exploiting the fear they've created, writes Zoe Williams.
  3. London’s ‘white flight’ deserves attention (Financial Times)
    That the city is no longer majority ‘white British’ is a remarkable development, writes David Goodhart.
  4. A huge risk we pro-Europeans must take (Guardian)
    Shaun Woodward writes that a referendum on the EU may now be the only way forward for those of us who see membership as vital to the UK's future.
  5. There’s a whiff of failure at the heart of our honours system (Telegraph)
    The PM promised to end the abuses, but there are signs of a return to the old ways, reports Peter Oborne.
  6. Britain needs to adopt a more German face (Financial Times)
    As a model of coping with sudden slowing, Berlin has achieved a better result than Tokyo, writes Chris Giles.
  7. Don’t lampoon what the NRA says. Ask why (Times)
    Guns are attractive, suicide complicated. Until we grasp the reasons behind the headlines, we remain unenlightened, argues David Aaronovitch
  8. With all the fuss over Kate Middleton's baby, have we learned nothing since Princess Diana?
    (Independent) God help us if the Royal Foetus is all we have to look forward to in 2013, writes Viv Groksop.
  9. Pensioners are about to be robbed yet again (Telegraph)
    The Chancellor is poised to alter the way inflation is calculated and interest paid, says Philip Johnston.
  10. So you think the wealth gap is growing? Wrong (Independent)
    Not only are we all in it together, but the rich are bearing and will bear a greater share of the burden of taxes than the poor. Why won't the Coalition say this more loudly, asks John Rentoul.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Sadiq Khan gives Jeremy Corbyn's supporters a lesson on power

The London mayor doused the Labour conference with cold electoral truths. 

There was just one message that Sadiq Khan wanted Labour to take from his conference speech: we need to be “in power”. The party’s most senior elected politician hammered this theme as relentlessly as his “son of a bus driver” line. His obsessive emphasis on “power” (used 38 times) showed how far he fears his party is from office and how misguided he believes Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters are.

Khan arrived on stage to a presidential-style video lauding his mayoral victory (a privilege normally reserved for the leader). But rather than delivering a self-congratulatory speech, he doused the conference with cold electoral truths. With the biggest personal mandate of any British politician in history, he was uniquely placed to do so.

“Labour is not in power in the place that we can have the biggest impact on our country: in parliament,” he lamented. It was a stern rebuke to those who regard the street, rather than the ballot box, as the principal vehicle of change.

Corbyn was mentioned just once, as Khan, who endorsed Owen Smith, acknowledged that “the leadership of our party has now been decided” (“I congratulate Jeremy on his clear victory”). But he was a ghostly presence for the rest of the speech, with Khan declaring “Labour out of power will never ever be good enough”. Though Corbyn joined the standing ovation at the end, he sat motionless during several of the applause lines.

If Khan’s “power” message was the stick, his policy programme was the carrot. Only in office, he said, could Labour tackle the housing crisis, air pollution, gender inequality and hate crime. He spoke hopefully of "winning the mayoral elections next year in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham", providing further models of campaigning success. 

Khan peroration was his most daring passage: “It’s time to put Labour back in power. It's time for a Labour government. A Labour Prime Minister in Downing Street. A Labour Cabinet. Labour values put into action.” The mayor has already stated that he does not believe Corbyn can fulfil this duty. The question left hanging was whether it would fall to Khan himself to answer the call. If, as he fears, Labour drifts ever further from power, his lustre will only grow.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.