How many Labour MPs oppose gay marriage?

Eight Labour MPs are on record as opposing equal marriage, which Ed Miliband will offer a free vote on.

I reported earlier that Ed Miliband will offer Labour MPs a free vote on allowing gay marriages in religious buildings. But how many in his party oppose the policy? I've compiled a list below of those Labour MPs on record as opposing equal marriage. There are far fewer than in the Conservative Party (as many as 130 Tory MPs are expected to vote against the measure) but more than some might expect.

For a comprehensive guide to where all MPs stand on the issue, I recommend the Coalition For Equal Marriage site.

Joe Benton MP for Bootle - Has signed the Coalition For Marriage petition.

Jim Dobbin MP for Heywood and Middleton - Told the Rochdale Observer: "The idea to redefine marriage at the present time is unacceptable to me. I do not think the government have thought it through because it will mean massive changes across the board to things such as people’s pensions and how they live. As a practising Christian my views are in kind with my beliefs. It is a simple straightforward view."

Brian Donohoe MP for Central Ayrshire - Told the Irvine Times: "I am, of course, against any form of discrimination. However, I also believe that marriage is a term used to describe the joining of a man and a woman only."

Mary Glindon MP for North Tyneside - Has signed the Coalition For Marriage petition

Roger Godsiff MP for Birmingham Hall Green - Has said he will oppose any law "redefining the current definition of marriage".

Austin Mitchell MP for Great Grimsby - Tweeted that "Gay marriage is neither urgent nor important.It's also a moral issue therefore a free vote on which basis it won't pass".

Paul Murphy MP for Torfaen - Confirmed lack of support via email to constituent.

Stephen Pound MP for Ealing North - Confirmed lack of support via email to constituent.

A wedding cake is seen during a demonstration in West Hollywood, California. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Autumn Statement 2015: George Osborne abandons his target

How will George Osborne close the deficit after his U-Turns? Answer: he won't, of course. 

“Good governments U-Turn, and U-Turn frequently.” That’s Andrew Adonis’ maxim, and George Osborne borrowed heavily from him today, delivering two big U-Turns, on tax credits and on police funding. There will be no cuts to tax credits or to the police.

The Office for Budget Responsibility estimates that, in total, the government gave away £6.2 billion next year, more than half of which is the reverse to tax credits.

Osborne claims that he will still deliver his planned £12bn reduction in welfare. But, as I’ve written before, without cutting tax credits, it’s difficult to see how you can get £12bn out of the welfare bill. Here’s the OBR’s chart of welfare spending:

The government has already promised to protect child benefit and pension spending – in fact, it actually increased pensioner spending today. So all that’s left is tax credits. If the government is not going to cut them, where’s the £12bn come from?

A bit of clever accounting today got Osborne out of his hole. The Universal Credit, once it comes in in full, will replace tax credits anyway, allowing him to describe his U-Turn as a delay, not a full retreat. But the reality – as the Treasury has admitted privately for some time – is that the Universal Credit will never be wholly implemented. The pilot schemes – one of which, in Hammersmith, I have visited myself – are little more than Potemkin set-ups. Iain Duncan Smith’s Universal Credit will never be rolled out in full. The savings from switching from tax credits to Universal Credit will never materialise.

The £12bn is smaller, too, than it was this time last week. Instead of cutting £12bn from the welfare budget by 2017-8, the government will instead cut £12bn by the end of the parliament – a much smaller task.

That’s not to say that the cuts to departmental spending and welfare will be painless – far from it. Employment Support Allowance – what used to be called incapacity benefit and severe disablement benefit – will be cut down to the level of Jobseekers’ Allowance, while the government will erect further hurdles to claimants. Cuts to departmental spending will mean a further reduction in the numbers of public sector workers.  But it will be some way short of the reductions in welfare spending required to hit Osborne’s deficit reduction timetable.

So, where’s the money coming from? The answer is nowhere. What we'll instead get is five more years of the same: increasing household debt, austerity largely concentrated on the poorest, and yet more borrowing. As the last five years proved, the Conservatives don’t need to close the deficit to be re-elected. In fact, it may be that having the need to “finish the job” as a stick to beat Labour with actually helped the Tories in May. They have neither an economic imperative nor a political one to close the deficit. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.