How many Labour MPs oppose gay marriage?

Eight Labour MPs are on record as opposing equal marriage, which Ed Miliband will offer a free vote on.

I reported earlier that Ed Miliband will offer Labour MPs a free vote on allowing gay marriages in religious buildings. But how many in his party oppose the policy? I've compiled a list below of those Labour MPs on record as opposing equal marriage. There are far fewer than in the Conservative Party (as many as 130 Tory MPs are expected to vote against the measure) but more than some might expect.

For a comprehensive guide to where all MPs stand on the issue, I recommend the Coalition For Equal Marriage site.

Joe Benton MP for Bootle - Has signed the Coalition For Marriage petition.

Jim Dobbin MP for Heywood and Middleton - Told the Rochdale Observer: "The idea to redefine marriage at the present time is unacceptable to me. I do not think the government have thought it through because it will mean massive changes across the board to things such as people’s pensions and how they live. As a practising Christian my views are in kind with my beliefs. It is a simple straightforward view."

Brian Donohoe MP for Central Ayrshire - Told the Irvine Times: "I am, of course, against any form of discrimination. However, I also believe that marriage is a term used to describe the joining of a man and a woman only."

Mary Glindon MP for North Tyneside - Has signed the Coalition For Marriage petition

Roger Godsiff MP for Birmingham Hall Green - Has said he will oppose any law "redefining the current definition of marriage".

Austin Mitchell MP for Great Grimsby - Tweeted that "Gay marriage is neither urgent nor important.It's also a moral issue therefore a free vote on which basis it won't pass".

Paul Murphy MP for Torfaen - Confirmed lack of support via email to constituent.

Stephen Pound MP for Ealing North - Confirmed lack of support via email to constituent.

A wedding cake is seen during a demonstration in West Hollywood, California. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.