How many Labour MPs oppose gay marriage?

Eight Labour MPs are on record as opposing equal marriage, which Ed Miliband will offer a free vote on.

I reported earlier that Ed Miliband will offer Labour MPs a free vote on allowing gay marriages in religious buildings. But how many in his party oppose the policy? I've compiled a list below of those Labour MPs on record as opposing equal marriage. There are far fewer than in the Conservative Party (as many as 130 Tory MPs are expected to vote against the measure) but more than some might expect.

For a comprehensive guide to where all MPs stand on the issue, I recommend the Coalition For Equal Marriage site.

Joe Benton MP for Bootle - Has signed the Coalition For Marriage petition.

Jim Dobbin MP for Heywood and Middleton - Told the Rochdale Observer: "The idea to redefine marriage at the present time is unacceptable to me. I do not think the government have thought it through because it will mean massive changes across the board to things such as people’s pensions and how they live. As a practising Christian my views are in kind with my beliefs. It is a simple straightforward view."

Brian Donohoe MP for Central Ayrshire - Told the Irvine Times: "I am, of course, against any form of discrimination. However, I also believe that marriage is a term used to describe the joining of a man and a woman only."

Mary Glindon MP for North Tyneside - Has signed the Coalition For Marriage petition

Roger Godsiff MP for Birmingham Hall Green - Has said he will oppose any law "redefining the current definition of marriage".

Austin Mitchell MP for Great Grimsby - Tweeted that "Gay marriage is neither urgent nor important.It's also a moral issue therefore a free vote on which basis it won't pass".

Paul Murphy MP for Torfaen - Confirmed lack of support via email to constituent.

Stephen Pound MP for Ealing North - Confirmed lack of support via email to constituent.

A wedding cake is seen during a demonstration in West Hollywood, California. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Why it's a mistake to assume that Jeremy Corbyn has already won

The shadow chief secretary to the Treasury on why the race to be Labour's leader is far from over.

They think it’s all over.

But they’re wrong.

The fat lady has yet to sing.

The commentary and reporting around the Labour party leadership campaign has started to assume we have a winner already in Jeremy Corbyn. The analysis, conjecture, predictions/complete guesswork about what happens next has begun in earnest. So we have seen speculation about who will be appointed to a Corbyn shadow cabinet, and “meet the team” pieces about Jeremy’s backroom operation.

Which is all very interesting and makes for the usual Westminster knockabout of who might be up and who might be going in the other direction pdq...

But I think it’s a mistake to say that Jeremy has already won.

Because I hear that tens of thousands of Labour party members, affiliates and registered supporters are yet to receive their ballot papers. And I am one of them. I can’t remember the last time I checked my post quite so religiously! But alas, my papers are yet to arrive.

This worries me a bit about the process. But mostly (assuming all the remaining ballots finally land in enough time to let us all vote) it tells me that frankly it’s still game on as far as the battle to become the next leader of the Labour party is concerned.

And this is reinforced when we consider the tens of thousands who have apparently received their papers but who have yet to vote. At every event I have attended in the last couple of weeks, and in at least half of all conversations I have had with members across the country, members are still making their minds up.

This is why we have to continue fighting for every vote until the end – and I will be fighting to get out every vote I possibly can for Yvette Cooper.

Over the campaign, Yvette has shown that she has a clear vision of the kind of Britain that she wants to see.

A Britain that tackles head-on the challenges of globalisation. Instead of the low-wage low-skill cul-de-sac being crafted by the Tories, Yvette's vision is for 2m more high skill manufacturing jobs. To support families she will prioritise a modern childcare system with 30 hours of fully funded child care for all 3 and 4 year olds and she will revive the bravery of post war governments to make sure 2m more homes are built within ten years.

It's an optimistic vision which taps into what most people in this country want. A job and a home.

And the responses of the focus groups on Newsnight a few days ago were telling – Yvette is clearly best placed to take us on the long journey to the 2020 general election by winning back former Labour voters.

We will not win an election without winning these groups back – and we will have to move some people who were in the blue column this time, to the red one next time. There is no other way to do it – and Yvette is the only person who can grow our party outwards so that once again we can build a winning coalition of voters across the country.