Where does Clegg now stand on an EU referendum?

The Lib Dems supported a referendum on EU withdrawal in their 2010 manifesto.

With an ever-greater number of Tory MPs demanding a referendum on EU withdrawal, it's worth recalling that one of the three main parties has already promised one - the Lib Dems. The party's 2010 election manifesto stated:

The European Union has evolved significantly since the last public vote on membership over thirty years ago. Liberal Democrats therefore remain committed to an in / out referendum the next time a British government signs up for fundamental change in the relationship between the UK and the EU.

As the leaflet below shows, the Lib Dems also campaigned on the issue.

In his speech on Europe yesterday, Clegg denounced the belief that Britain could repatriate powers from the EU as "wishful thinking", adding that "as soon as we start talking about repatriation, we descend into the in-versus-out debate". It is precisely for this reason that the Lib Dems argued for a referendum on withdrawal at the last election. More recently, however, the party has made no mention of the pledge, taking the view that, with the eurozone in crisis, now would be "the wrong time" for a vote.

With Cameron shortly expected to outline plans to hold a referendum after the next election on a "new EU settlement" for Britain, it remains to be seen how Clegg responds. Tory MPs, if not his own party, are unlikely to let him forget his recent support for a vote on membership.

Nick Clegg gives a press conference in Brussels in 2011. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Vote Leave have won two referendums. Can they win a third?

The Remain campaign will hope that it is third-time unlucky for Vote Leave's tried-and-tested approach.

Vote Leave have launched a new campaign today, offering a £50m prize if you can guess the winner of every game at the Euros this summer. They’ve chosen the £50m figure as that is the sum that Vote Leave say the United Kingdom send to the European Union every day.

If you wanted to sum up Vote Leave’s approach to the In-Out referendum in a single gimmick, this is surely it, as it is deceitful – and effective. The £50m figure is a double deception – it’s well in excess of what Britain actually pays, and your chances of winning are so small they can only be viewed through an electron microscope. Saying that “the UK pays £50m to the EU” is like saying “I paid £10 for breakfast at Gregg’s this morning” – yes, I paid with a £10 note, but I got £8 back.  The true figure is closer to £26,000 a day.

But the depressing truth is that this sort of fact-free campaigning works – and has worked before. It’s the same strategy that Matthew Elliott, the head of Vote Leave, deployed to devastating effect, when he was head of the No to AV campaign, and that Dominic Cummings, head of strategy at Vote Leave, used when he was in charge of the anti-North East Assembly campaign: focus on costs, often highly-inflated ones, and repeat, over and over again.

This competition is a great vessel for that message, too, with the potential to reach anyone who has at least one Facebook friend with an interest in betting or football, i.e. everyone. And as my colleague Kirsty Styles revealed yesterday, this latest campaign is just one in a series of Internet-based, factually dubious campaigns and adverts being used by Vote Leave on the Internet.

The difficulty for the opponents of No2AV was, as one alumni of that campaign reflected recently, “how do you repudiate it without repeating it?”. A row over whether the United Kingdom sends £50m or £26,000 – itself £1,000 higher than the average British salary – helps the Leave campaign whichever way it ends up.

Neither Yes to Fairer Votes or supporters of a devolved assembly for the North East ever found a defence against the Elliott-Cummings approach. Time is running out for Britain Stronger In Europe to prevent them completing the hattrick. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.