Where does Clegg now stand on an EU referendum?

The Lib Dems supported a referendum on EU withdrawal in their 2010 manifesto.

With an ever-greater number of Tory MPs demanding a referendum on EU withdrawal, it's worth recalling that one of the three main parties has already promised one - the Lib Dems. The party's 2010 election manifesto stated:

The European Union has evolved significantly since the last public vote on membership over thirty years ago. Liberal Democrats therefore remain committed to an in / out referendum the next time a British government signs up for fundamental change in the relationship between the UK and the EU.

As the leaflet below shows, the Lib Dems also campaigned on the issue.

In his speech on Europe yesterday, Clegg denounced the belief that Britain could repatriate powers from the EU as "wishful thinking", adding that "as soon as we start talking about repatriation, we descend into the in-versus-out debate". It is precisely for this reason that the Lib Dems argued for a referendum on withdrawal at the last election. More recently, however, the party has made no mention of the pledge, taking the view that, with the eurozone in crisis, now would be "the wrong time" for a vote.

With Cameron shortly expected to outline plans to hold a referendum after the next election on a "new EU settlement" for Britain, it remains to be seen how Clegg responds. Tory MPs, if not his own party, are unlikely to let him forget his recent support for a vote on membership.

Nick Clegg gives a press conference in Brussels in 2011. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.